APPENDIX 1c  (Subsidiary Musical Index)

WORKS SURVIVING AS LYRICS FOR WHICH THERE IS NO EVIDENCE OF MUSIC HAVING BEEN SET

ALWAYS BE NICE TO FATHER (1920's)

AS LONG AS YOU LOVE ME A LITTLE (October 1917)
(dedicated “to I”[vor Novello])
BLUE LANTERNS
See 'CHINESE CYCLE' below

BUBBLES
See GINGER UP on main index
BYGONE DAYS (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.

CHINESE CYCLE (c.1919)
Three linked 'oriental' lyrics found in the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook, all fairly simplistic and short: BLUE LANTERNS, THE SILKEN CORD and SONG OF THE RICE GROVE.  The first two lines of lyrics from 'The Silken Cord' were later reused in 'JAPANESE LOVE SONG' of c.1925 (see main index).

COCKTAIL CHORUS (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse lyric survives.

CRISSA  (CHRISSA) (1919/20)
(Draft for two-act Opera set in Sicily)
The last of the lyrics included in the notebooks in "Mum's suitcase".  There are suggestions that Doris Joel was involved as co-librettist with Coward, but the only surviving evidence of finished work is in Coward's own hand.  It was to have had music set by Max Darewski, but according to Darewski's widow it was never completed, if indeed it ever started.  The constituent finished lyrics are: SOME DAY MY LOVER WILL COME TO ME (Crissa's Entrance), I AM CRISSA, SINGING MAID OF SICILY (Aria), AH, SEE THE SUN ONCE MORE (prelude to Buonamici's Aria, end of Act 1) and LOVE BRINGS TO US THE MESSAGE OF SPRING (duet for Crissa and Buonamici).

CROSS YOUR HEART (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.

CYCLING HOME (c.1925)
A note on the lyric in the Coward Estate archives suggests that this was a number intended for Laddie Cliff of The Co-Optimists.

DON'TS FOR MY DARLINGS (1952)
Lyric in the Coward archives without any evidence of  music having been set - limerick-type verses (10 of them) celebrating Anne Rothermere and Ian Fleming's wedding.  See also GOLDENEYE CALYPSO on Appendix 1b
DREAMS (April 20, 1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics, where it is precisely dated.
FOR YOU I'M PINING (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.

HERE IN THE SUMMERTIME
Barry Day has identified two very slightly different versions of this lyric, one of which he believes dates from the twenties, the other from the fifties.  Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.

I ALWAYS WANTED TO BE TRUE TO YOU (1926)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.
I DREAMED OF YOU (1920's)
intended for inclusion in a revue but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.
I LIVE IN A WORLD OF MY OWN (c.1918)
Not from the notebooks.  Although what is probably a "refrain section" of this lyric has very clear implications of a 3/4 time waltz rhythm, this does not amount to much evidence of specific music having been set.

I MUSN'T SAY THAT (EVERYBODY SAYS THAT I'M A CHATTERBOX)
Early 1920's miscellaneous lyric.

I REMEMBER (1920's)
A "pseudo-Cockney" lyric concerning a costermonger dreaming about riches
I TAKE THE HIGH ROAD (See 'TAMARAN'  on Appendix 1a above)
I'M NOT A FOOL AS A RULE (1918)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.  An early attempt "to strike the note of sophisticated cynicism for which he was to become famous" (Barry Day).

IS SHE HAPPY? (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.
IT ISN'T WHAT YOU DO (1920's)
The surviving lyric is interesting on account of preserving an echo of the opening of the refrain of FORBIDDEN FRUIT (q.v.)

IT WAS HORRID (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.

JAPANESE CYCLE (c.1919)
A collection of four linked 'oriental' lyrics from the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook: SATSIAMA, THE WATER LILY POND, PRETTY WHITE DOVE and LITTLE LACQUER LADY.
JOURNEE HEUREUSE
Lyric for a short refrain only, in French.  There is no indication of the possible show for which it may have been intended.  Conversation Piece might seem to be a logical guess, but it is not the only thing in French that Coward did, and he was apt to show off his command of French at the drop of a hat.
LADY FROM VIENNA (1920's)
Lyric fragment only survives

LAST WEDNESDAY ON THE PIAZZA
See VENICE (below)
LET MY DREAMS RETURN (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.

LISTEN TO ME (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.

LITTLE BUNDLE OF DREAMS (c.1926)
A lyric fragment in the Coward Estate archive shows this to have been a number intended for Melville Gideon and Phyllis Monkman of the Co-Optimists troupe.

LITTLE FRENCH LADY (1918)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics; an early attempt "to stike the note of sophisticated cynicism for which he was to become famous" (Barry Day).
LITTLE LACQUER LADY
See 'JAPANESE CYCLE' above

LOUISE (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse and refrain survive.

LOVE A LITTLE (early 1920's)
Miscellaneous lyric which has certain resonances to the verse section of HALF CASTE WOMAN

MADELINE (c.1918)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" lyrics recently unearthed by Barry Day.
MARRIAGE IS A FATAL CURSE (1920's)
Lyric fragment only survives

MARRIAGE IS THE GAME FOR ME (1920's)
Lyric fragment only survives

MATADOR (1950's)
A literal translation of a strange song in Spanish, whose purpose is unclear but probably satirical.

MAUDIE GOLIGHTLY (1920's?)
A lyric refrain only survives.  The character depicted - a 'twice-nightly' music-hall artiste - was considered for inclusion in After the Ball in 1954, but (as Barry Day puts it) she "failed the audition".

MEMORIES (1917)
A sort of sugary sentimental AA Milne parody - not from "Mums Suitcase" notebooks.

MUSICAL MEMORIES (1920's)
A lyric about the potency of cheap music
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIX (early 1920's)
Lyric fragment only survives
OFFICE HOURS (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.

OH, BABY (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse lyric survives.

OLD STORY (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.
ONE FINE DAY (See ' TAMARAN' on Appendix 1a above)
PORTRAIT OF A LADY  (See VELAZQUEZ on Main index)
PRETTY WHITE DOVE
See 'JAPANESE CYCLE' above

SATSIAMA
See 'JAPANESE CYCLE' above

SATURDAY NIGHT (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse lyric survives.

SHE SHALL HAVE MUSIC (1920's)
SILKEN CORD (THE DREAM OF DEATH),
and SONG OF THE RICE GROVE
See 'CHINESE CYCLE' above
SOMETHIN' YOU GOTTA FIND OUT YOURSELF
This was a discarded item originally intended for Sail Away  of 1963, but the material in the archives preserves only the title without lyrics

SOMETIMES WHEN I'M WEARY (1920's)
Two short verse lyrics survive
SUBURBIA (early 1920's?)

TAKING AFTER DEAR OLD DAD (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single lyric refrain survives.

(AND) THAT GIRL'S YOU (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" lyrics recently unearthed by Barry Day
THERE'S A PIXIE IN MY GARDEN (1917?)

THIS MOMENT (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse lyric survives.

THIS YEAR, NEXT YEAR (1920's)

TRAVEL IN A TRAIN WITH ME (1920's)
Intended for inclusion in a revue, but didn't get there.  A single verse lyric survives.
TWILIGHT (c.1919)
One of the "Mum's Suitcase" notebook lyrics.  Incomplete.

VENICE (1950's)
This was published as a verse in NCowardy CustardV, but there are suggestions that it may have been conceived as a song lyric.  The archives show some slight variations from the published version.
WATER LILY POND THE (c.1919)
See 'JAPANESE CYCLE' above
WE'LL ALWAYS SIGH (early 1920's)
Single lyric refrain

WHEN I HAVE FEARS
This is well-known as a verse (published in NCowardy CustardV), but it also exists in a typewritten lyric sheet among material in the Coward London archive "lyric drawer", suggesting that it may also have had a musical setting.  A strong lyric, which has definite similarities in scansion and mood to I AM NO GOOD AT LOVE, which was also published in NCowardy CustardV.  The lines "Of the moment I'll cease to be" and "And the peace of the changing sea" in particular fit the musical lines of "I betray it with little sins" and "And too much itensity" of the latter song.

WHEN WOMEN COME INTO THEIR OWN (c.1925)
A single lyric refrain survives, whose sentiment reflects the growing social influence of women in the male-depleted post-Great War world.
YOU'VE GONE AWAY - See THE DREAM IS OVER on main index
YOU'VE GOT A LITTLE PIECE OF LOVE IN YOUR HEART (early 1920's)
Single lyric refrain