W, X, Y & Z Titles

W

WAIT A BIT, JOE

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1942/3?)
Sigh No More, 1945
Sep.publ.
Judy Campbell, who was on tour with NC in 1942 & 43, particularly recalled NC’s muse being "grabbed by a rhumba rhythm" at that time. Since we know that the obvious rhumba candidate, ‘Nina’, was not composed until 1944, and this is the only other vaguely contemporaneous song which features a rhumba-ish rhythm, it may well have been this song whose gestation Judy Campbell remembers. It would not be at all unusual for a revue-type song to be composed two or more years before its use.
However, unpublished Diaries extracts show that the main period of composition occurred quite suddenly as late as 7th August 1945 (the show opened on the 22nd), when “after I had gone to bed I suddenly had an idea for Graham to do a brisk single with tap dance ... a tune started in my mind”.  Concentrated work followed on the 9th, but NC was “in despair when suddenly the title ‘Wait a Bit Joe’ dropped into my mind.  Had a strong drink and went at it like a bull at a gate and completed verse and chorus.  Sent for Robb [Stewart] and dictated it.”
At least during 1946/47, NC had a dog he called Wait A Bit Joe. (There was a second called Matelot which died suddenly in December 1946.)
This song has an easy, free-rhythmic short verse section, before launching into the rhumba-ish refrain. This has elegant, long lines with much rhythmic vitality despite (or because of) the repeated four-syllable fragments of which it is mostly composed. Then at the ends of the main lines, there is that attention-getting, arresting triplet rhythm to the words “Wait a bit, wait a bit, Joe”: a neat musical onomatopoeia.
This is a piece which needs careful accompaniment. I think the rushing soft-brush rhythms of the percussionist on NCR 40 are particularly apt; and in fact NCR 40 is, like for ‘Time And Again’, a splendid realisation of the song’s potential with NC himself in particularly fine voice.
It’s a mature and effective song, full of classic NC touches, and deserves wider exposure.
NCR 28: pno. acc. Robb Stewart (1945)
NCR 40: + orch. cond. & pno. acc. Peter Matz (1956)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)

WAIT FOR ME

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(1946)
intended for Pacific 1860 (Madame Salvador) but unused
Unpubl. MS
'Tempo di Valse'. The MS gives music only for the refrain. However, the archives also preserved a typewritten lyric sheet for this number which shows a verse section sandwiched between two refrains.
A shame that this was victim to a drop, since it is really a very lovely slow waltz refrain indeed. Much in the same sort of style as the ‘Bright Was The Day’ waltz, though perhaps less powerfully characteristic.

WAITING IN A QUEUE

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(1927)
This Year of Grace, 1928 (Act I opening) (Sonnie Hale & Chorus)
Vocal Score TYOG
The sketch in which this chorus song occurred is called ‘The Tube’, and proceeds later with the entrance of the character 'Mary' and her song, MARY MAKE-BELIEVE (q.v.).
The number pokes fun at the British passion for queuing, but does so in the most rhythmically spiky and syncopated way, with short sequences of stressed cross-rhythms in the refrain, which has already been picked out as the very opening notes at the start of the (orchestral) intro. This is apt, as passages of syncopated and/or stressed cross-ryhthms are a feature of many songs that follow in this score, so this piece sort of sets the musical tone of the whole.

WAITING IN THE WINGS

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(1960)
Waiting in the Wings, 1960
publ.WW folio (1962)
‘The Wings’ is a retirement home for retired thespians. Aged actresses are remembering their former glamour and glory. Prompted by the character Bonita who picks up the phrase saying “That would make a wonderful number”, the character Maud “invents” at the piano a little musical ditty. It is a very short and trite 6/8 number, in which The entire lyric is: “Waiting in the wings, waiting in the wings/ Older than God, on we plod/ Waiting in the wings,/ Hopping about the garden/ Like a lot of Douglas Byngs/ Waiting, waiting, waiting in the wings.”

WALLA WALLA BOOLA (THE)

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1963)
The Girl Who Came to Supper,1963
Unpubl. MS
From the sequence of songs collectively called 'The Coconut
Girl', purporting to be a resumé of the show in which Mary Martin is appearing. This song is supposed to be "the dance hit of the show". Barry Day suggests lyric shades of ‘Baseball Rag’ and ‘The Saggie Boo’ about this number, and I’d also add musical shades of 'Ginger Up' (q.v.). It is a hectic piling-up of rhymes on the words ‘walla’ and ‘boola’ to an almost perpetual stream of jaunty dotted-note rhythms.
NCR 46: + pno. acc. Unknown (1963)

WALTZ
see BITTER SWEET VALSE

WALTZ
(Waltzes from Conversation Piece, 1934)
Music is variously from: THE GARDENS, REGENCY RAKES and NEVERMORE (q.v.)

WALTZ and TRIO
See BITTER SWEET VALSE

WALTZ THEME
See IN WHICH WE SERVE

WALTZING
See Appendix 1.b

WE ARE LIVING IN A CHANGING WORLD

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(1941)
No known use
Sep.publ. (USA) 1941
NC dedicated this song to Jerome Kern. It is not known quite how or why it came to be published as it did. In the Estate archives there was also a MS of this complete song in the hand of Robb Stewart. We do not think he started amanuensis work with NC until after 1941 (Elsie April was still around), so this confirms that the song was written out again later, almost certainly during preparation of Pacific 1860.
And in fact, this song is clearly an earlier version of what was re-worked to become THIS IS A CHANGING WORLD. What the pieces share, almost note-for-note and word-for-word, is their Verse sections, though the publications are presented in different keys.
Here, the song is presented Refrain-Verse-Refrain, whereas TIACW starts with the Verse and repeats the Refrain.
The whole sentiment and mood of this piece is pregnant with meaning: Jerome Kern was NC’s confessed songwriting idol, the master of melodic sentiment and the delicious keychange; and it was wartime - with all the doubts about both past and future that this throws up. You then look at this piece, and find the opening lyrics, “Wake up, forget your dreams/ For it seems we’re living in a changing world … the past is dead …” set to a tune of wistful melodic sentiment. In the second refrain the lyrics become even more resolute: “Dreams are doomed to fade … Farewell to ‘Flaming Youth’, face the truth …”. In the middle of this there is the shared Verse section, one of NC’s most strikingly romantic/nostalgic ballad sections, featuring exotic enharmonic keychanges – very much a part of Kern’s musical signature.
So, to all those who say that NC became “out of touch” with post-war feeling because he was stuck in a pre-war past, the fact of this song in 1941 actually shows that he realised, at a quite early stage, that the pre-war world he had lived and worked within, was gone never to return. It did not stop him mourning its passing, nor prevent this sort of sentiment resurfacing again and again in his post-war music. But he clearly felt the moment of change, and felt it important enough to want to mark it consciously and deliberately
(See THIS IS A CHANGING WORLD)

WE LIVE OUR LIVES IN CITY STREETS
See Appendix 1.b

WE MUST ALL BE VERY KIND TO AUNTIE JESSIE

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1924?
No known show use
CPA1 (1938 - first publication)
NCG1
NCR
The HMV archives show that NC himself made a recording of this piece on 10th August 1925, but that is was rejected for issue. Had it been issued, it would be NCR 01!
Then followed thirteen years while the song languished in the drawer, emerging in CPA1 which seems to have been seen by NC as an opportunity to get some neglected numbers into circulation.
It is a well-constructed, gentle, revue-type comedy point-number, which was worth the effort to expose it. It has the typically Cowardesque lyric attitude of benign derision, in this case at the expense of an unpleasant-sounding maiden aunt. There are two 12-bar Verse sections and three 16-bar Refrains in a standard 4-phrase pattern, which pack in quite a lot of good rhyming lyric writing in flowing quavers. There is one exceptional harmonic moment at the start of the final refrain phrase, when the progression from Fminor to Eb is achieved not via the expected Bb7 but via the extraordinary B7! Joyce Grenfell on ONR129 (not widely available) captures the sweetly-sentimental flavour of the joke very nicely.
ONR129: Joyce Grenfell + Mantovani orch. (1947)
ONR 26: Roderick Cook (Oh Coward!, 1972)
ONR 30a: Dennis Olsen + orch. (1981)

WE SHAN'T BE ON TONIGHT
see OPENING CHORUS (Words And Music, 1932)

WE WERE DANCING

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1935)
Tonight at 8.30: We Were Dancing 1935-6 (NC)
Sep.publ.
NCSB
NCG1
NCR
Though less theatrically atmospheric than ‘Then’ or ‘You Were There’, this piece is very much one that evolves from the same sort of dramatic context, and shares with the other songs a heady, visionary quality which ably illustrated in the musical numbers the slightly disorientating, cinematic flashback effect of the drama. In fact, you could argue that it was the inclusion of the musical pieces which made this stage effect work at all.
The verse section is a brief fluster of quavers (“We’ve stepped into a dream”) set in a fast waltz, and the piece soon launches into the refrain after two big “held” notes set to NC’s favourite 5#7 dominant chord. This fast waltz refrain has some unusual qualities for a waltz: its opening notes are strongly syncopated and the song goes on to make a feature of the syncopated element; it also has wierd phrase-lengths, the first part being bar-lengths 6+6+4 before reiterating material in a (more normal) 8+sort-of-8.
There is then a keychange (from D to F) for an extended Interlude section, maintaining the fast waltz but with a much smoother and less busy melodic line. This theme is rather reminiscent of ‘The Last Dance’ from Bitter Sweet. A restatement of the refrain follows.
It is a busy, energetic piece with a lot of forward momentum. Musically, at least, the whole piece might easily be transplanted into one of the Viennese café scenes in Bitter Sweet without doing too much violence to that concept, and the lyrics reveal it to be a nostalgic harking back to this sort of past.
NCR 17 is effectively part of OCR 09 (see Discography). It was recorded less than a month after OCR 09 with the same orchestra. In this session only two songs were recorded, the other being a fairly definitive NCR of ‘Parisian Pierrot’.
NCR 17: +Orch. cond. & pno. acc. Greenwood (Feb.1936)
ONR 29: Georges Tzipine Orch. (1954?)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)
ONR 20: Patricia Hodge & Lewis Fiander (1986)
ONR 19: Valerie Anastasio acc. Tim Harbold (2000)

WE WISH TO ORDER WINE
see OFFICERS' CHORUS

WE'LL ALWAYS SIGH
see Appendix 1c

WE'RE SICK OF BEING...
see PRETTY LITTLE BRIDESMAIDS

WE'RE TWO STAGE-HANDS (WE'RE EIGHT...)
see FINALE (This Year of Grace)

WEARY OF IT ALL
see I'M SO WEARY OF IT ALL

WEDDING TOAST / WEDDING CHORUS
see THIS IS A NIGHT FOR LOVERS

WELCOME TO POOTZIE VAN DOYLE

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1963)
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963
Unpubl. MS
Part of 'The Coconut Girl' sequence of songs, and therefore a pastiche of American musical 1910. (Pootzie Van Doyle purports to be the coconut-oil magnate father of Tina, “the Coconut Girl”.) There is one brief refrain.
NCR 46: +pno. acc. Unknown (1963)

WESTMINSTER ABBEY
see CORONATION CHORALE

WHAT A CENTURY
see OH WHAT A CENTURY IT'S BEEN

WHAT A SAUCY GIRL
see Appendix 1b

WHAT AM I TO DO? (words & music by Cole Porter)
See Appendix 1.e

WHAT CAN IT MEAN
(MRS ERLYNNE's ARIA)

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December 1953 (Jamaica) [NCD]
After the Ball, 1954, but CUT before London.
Unpubl. MS
Text in GP p.57 & BD
The piece was originally from Act I Sc.3. The music includes sections showing new melodic construction starting with the words “How much can one mad moment of passion cost?” and “I cannot ever let her know”.
The whole sequence of music was cut on account of Mary Ellis being vocally not up to it. NC’s comments on this, and the problems it caused, can be found in NCD 1April, 9 May and 13 June 1954. Commenting later to Coley on this and the other cuts which had to be made he said it had been “seven minutes of my best music and lyrics sacrificed”, though use of the word ‘best’ here is open to argument.
All this cut music is much in the mould of the rest of the score – rich, lush harmonies and romantically-arching melodies – but it has greater unpredictability than most of it. The second section features the melody line in the accompaniment/orchestra while the voice sings a counter-melody. However, again like much of the score, the music does not progress or seem to go anywhere much, and one wonders rather what it was that NC was trying to recreate here. It is certainly no Bitter Sweet style.

WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO CHARLES?

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1964?
High Spirits (One night at New Haven, March 1964, then dropped)
MS in private collection
Lyrics in BD p.354
This is a long chorus number. As Charles Condomine learns to live with with the ghost of his first wife who is visible and audible only to him, his friends and neighbours, unsurprisingly, start to notice his erratic behaviour. This is their song of comment, made at a typical English scene of Sunday morning at the pub.
The music and lyrics for this show (based on Blithe Spirit) were written by Hugh Martin and Timothy Gray. NC made lyric contributions to ‘Home Sweet Heaven’ and ‘The Society’ and seems to have been solely responsible for this song.
It comments as much on how English people pass their time on Sundays as much as being gossip and comment about Charles Condomine, and consists of fairly long passages of individual comments interjected by a number of different voices, sandwiched between and interspersed with chorus refrains in Gb.
BD says: “One performance was all it took to convince everyone, including Noël, that the number was ‘too English’. The audience just didn’t ‘get it’.” We add that the music is not coherently strong enough to carry the lyrics within a satisfying structure or with any melodic rewards.
This is probably the last song NC ever composed.

WHAT HO, MRS BRISKET

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DISCOGRAPHY:

Feb-Mar. 1963, Jamaica [NCD, 10 Mar. 63]
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963 (Tessie O’Shea)
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
NCG2
This forms part of the sequence of ‘London’ songs, which purport to be cockney or music-hall-type point numbers. This one is rather redolent of those seaside postcard cartoons where dreadful double-entendres are made at the expense of very busty ladies in swimsuits. It is a brisk little refrain in marching 2/4 tempo.
NCR 46: + pno. acc. Unknown (1963)
OCR 20: Tessie O'Shea & ensemble (Dec 1963)

WHAT IS LOVE?

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1928
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Act 1 Sc.3) (Peggy Wood & chorus)
Vocal Score BS
Fast waltz aria, sung by Sarah in her first flush of directionless emotion in the moments just before she realises that it is Carl Linden whom she really loves.
It has something of the same controlled passion and edgy rubato quality as ‘Zigeuner’, and also demonstrates one of NC’s abrupt but satisfactory keychanges. The refrain (which starts with the words “Tell me- tell me- “) engages the attention, like one of Borodin’s ‘Polovtsian Dances’, by bouncing the words off the empty first beat of the bar. In fact, it is a total surprise when you get to this “refrain”, since the introductory section (“Play something gay to me…”) is a strong enough and long enough theme in its own right to have lulled you into thinking that it is the ‘main’ part of the song.
A further two verses are part-danced and part-sung between Sarah and the chorus. The music has the bredth and reach to bear 3 or 4 repetitions, and is a perfect vehicle for the gathering movement on stage “until the whole stage is encircled by a wheel of young people laughing and chattering”.
The whole works well as a melody alone but there is considerable dramatic passion to be had from the words and music together if full advantage is taken of the various printed tempo and stylistic directions (for a change they are not merely publishers’ whims).
This piece ranks among the most "operatic" of NC's output, a
worthwhile interpretation of which is demonstrated in ONR 01. ONR 04 shows a romantic indulgence of tempo at the expense of rhythmic impetus, and is fine if you don't mind the Disneyesque wordless chorus.
ONR130: J. MacDonald & Nelson Eddy + orch. (1940)
ONR 02: Adele Leigh + orch (1961)
ONR 04: June Bronhill + orch (1969)
ONR 01: Valerie Masterson+New Sadler's Wells orch.(1988)

WHAT LOVE MEANS TO (A) GIRL(S) LIKE ME

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DISCOGRAPHY:

1922
London Calling! 1923 (Maisie Gay)
This Year of Grace 1928
Sep.Publ. (Keith Prowse & Co., now EMI) 1923
The title '...A Girl...' is given only on the title page of the published sheet music. The text in the song copy, in NCSL and all other printed sources gives '...Girls...'.
The song’s inclusion in TYOG was as a substitution for ‘It Doesn’t Matter How Old You Are’.
The piece is a very four-square composition in both verse and refrain, using for its phrases passages of quavers for one bar, sometimes three consecutive bars, followed by a “hold” note, all in slowish 4/4 tempo. It is in truth more like a recitation of metrical verse (the refrain is even marked colla voce in the accompaniment) and the music is not very much more than a chordal accompaniment. It is, after all, a sort of winsome, naughty-girlie number probably written with Maisie Gay’s performing talents in mind, and has far more to do with the delivery of two verses and three refrains of close-packed lyrics than anything else. Of its type – a revue point number – it is a good enough example, but it does not excite musical attention.
OCR 01: Maisie Gay (1924)

WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN TO THE CHILDREN?

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early 1927?
Whitebirds (Revue), His Majesty’s Theatre, May 1927 (Maisie Gay)
The Bow-Wows (Revue), Prince of Wales' Theatre, Dec.1927 (Betty Chester)
Unpubl. MS
The forerunner of the following song, but there's no significant musical connection although the lyrics are very much of a pattern, particularly in their theme phrase, and occasional lines of original lyric reoccur in the later version. Confusingly, this song was also known as '...to the Tots' by the time of The Bow-Wows. It was the whole original scene which, in the printed programme, is called ‘What Is To Become Of The Children?’ (BD has this as a song title, which is not quite right.)
The archives retained a MS copy of this early version in Norman Hackforth’s hand, so one assumes that the piece was dusted off for possible inclusion in the Café de Paris cabaret shows or NCSB, and presumably discarded as musically and/or lyrically too weak at that time.
Like the later version, this song has two verses and three refrains, but is otherwise of an altogether less ambitious construction. You can see the inspiration for the later version in many points of detail in rhythm and lyrics, but the later song takes the original ideas and produces something of much greater stature which is way beyond this original in every respect.
This original version is quite march-like, especially at the start, which uses fanfare-like melodic phrases, but interspersed with more recitational passages. The refrain is clearly marked as “march tempo” at the start of its main and reprise phrases. It is here where the correspondence to the reworked song is closest rhythmically, but the new song presents this as a rollicking 6/8 rather than the original 4/4. The lyrics are rather good but, though the very best bits were transferred to the later song, as a whole they now sound a little dated. Addressing a song to the “women of the Empire” doesn’t have much mileage today …

WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN TO THE TOTS?

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DISCOGRAPHY:

Jamaica, September (?) 1955
Together With Music (US TV show, 22 Oct 1955)
NCG
NCD, 5 Oct. 55: “I have also written the required second verse for ‘What’s Going To Happen To The Tots’, and so the last of my lyric-writing is done for the moment.” We take this to mean ‘the required second Verse sectio’ and that the rest of it had already been completed. Peter Matz was in attendance in Jamaica from 11 September till the end of the month, helping to prepare for TWM.
I’ve always considered this song a pair with the following year’s ‘Why Must The Show Go On?’. Of the two, ‘Why Must The Show’ probably has the edge in terms of rhythmic/lyric complexity and musical scope; but I do not think the latter could have emerged as a highest-quality work without the “dry-run” model of ‘What’s Going To Happen’, with which it shares most of its principal qualities and characteristics. The correspondence in metre and rhythm is obvious, and the musical style so typical of NC’s comedy manner that it needs no description: this is the sort of thing that gets parodied whenever someone wants to do “a Noël Coward number”. The two pieces also share a certain tone of voice: they are angry and moralistic diatribes, piling up absurd pictures of louche and degenerate behaviour in much the same way as in earlier works such as ‘Marvellous Party’, but with much more waspishness and bitterness and less affection.
This song takes the basic ideas and forms of the 1927 version and turns it from a creaky old Ford into a Rolls Royce. Both Verse and Refrain are more or less solid fast lyric in steady tempo, with everything falling into 8-bar phrases, or almost: in its music the Verse structure is A,A+4 bars,B,B, and the Refrain A,B,C,D,E – a whole world beyond the scope of the 1927 version, and in all ways now a significantly clever and refined song.
NCR 40 is a fairly definitive performance. NCR 41 is a live performance from the last Night Of 100 Stars and suffers from poor recording quality, but is fascinating on account of 1) using the pre-America accompanist with post-America arrangements, 2) it being NH’s last known accompaniment appearance with NC, 3) being a useful reminder that even NC could get a word wrong from time to time.
OCR 16: NC +orch./acc. Matz (Together With Music, 1955)
NCR 40: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (1956)
NCR 41: + orch./acc Norman Hackforth (1958)
ONR 05a: Steve Ross (2004)

WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH A NICE BEEF STEW

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Feb-Mar. 1963, Jamaica [NCD, 10 Mar. 63]
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963
Cut before NY (Tessie O’Shea)
Unpubl. MS
NCD, 10 March 63: “I have completed four numbers, all good ones. I did all four complete, words and music, in one morning, and I am very proud of them. They are really like old London pub songs and are funny without trying to be.” This song is the last of the four in the sequence of ‘London’ songs, and like ‘What Ho, Mrs Brisket’ is a brisk refrain of four phrases, and it has the same sort of saucy overtones, but this time it’s in 6/8 tempo. It was probably cut around 5th October, when NCD noted: “The whole show … will be better still on Monday after Joe [Layton] has rehearsed and redone ‘London’ over the weekend … the number is still too long and complicated”.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST DISCOVER YOU WERE DIFFERENT?

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1960, intended for Later Than Spring (which later became Sail Away )
unused
Unpubl. MS. (Marked “Out 3.19.61”)
The archives also preserve a section of dialogue ('Scene in Tamarinda's Suite' - see BD) indicated to be half sung half spoken, which is the preamble to this number, sung by a psychoanalytic professor to his 'poor little rich girl' patient.
This is a gently-paced rum-te-tum number, but written in 4/4 not 6/8. There are three refrains but no verse section.
A fragment of rhythmic/melodic setting, in the fifth bar, reminds one of “She’s a bit of an ugly duckling” from ‘Mrs Worthington’, which may be apt. Clever lyrics on a highly unusual theme, but no great inventive inspiration in the music, possibly because NC found it difficult to empathise emotionally with such a scene.
Could this be the only known example of a psychoanalyst’s consultation being set to music?

WHEN FOREIGN PRINCES COME TO VISIT US

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1962-63)
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963 (Carey Nairnes, etc.)
Unpubl. MS
This is a quartet of male voices, the vocal harmonisation of which was probably executed by the show’s MD or a professional arranger. (This is likely to be true for many other chorus numbers from this show.) The MD’s MS shows the main part of the song being followed, after “Chateauneuf du Pape”, by a 3/4 up-tempo dance, then a polka (marked “cut”) and some more vigorous 2/4 dancing on the same melodic theme, before the chorus finish the piece in song again, in the original restrained manner, for the final punchline couplet of lyrics. NC is unlikely to have been responsible for the dance arrangements.
This is a chorus point-number, the footmen at the Carpathian Legation sharing the range of their behind-the-scenes activities when preparing the setting for a royal attempt at seduction. There’s more than an aroma here of the shades of the ‘Footmen Quartet’ from Bitter Sweet, and it shares the same relaxed, cynical attitude. The lyrics are neatly witty, with some lovely rhymes, the music of passing rather than memorable interest, with one typical NC keyshift (a phrase in Ab out of the C setting).
NCR 46: +pno. acc. Unknown (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: Carey Nairnes & chorus (Dec 1963)

WHEN I HAVE FEARS
See Appendix 1.c

WHEN MY SHIP COMES HOME

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1923)
London Calling!, 1923 (Oona Mairs)
Sep.Pub. (Keith Prowse & Co. (now EMI)) 1924
This is a melodic ballad. What makes it special is a harmonic delight in the short intro, where chords of B major7 are alternated with Eb. This immediately gives a dreamily impressionistic, Debussy-esque feel to things even before one gets started.
The verse is fairly slight, twelve bars mostly in flowing quavers, and the refrain four four-bar phrases, A,B,A,C, none of which sounds very exciting. But simplicity and openness are everything in this piece, and its musical and phrasal simplicity is just right for the gentle mood of longing for a better future, which is the point of the song.
The song ought to figure more in NC retrospectives: it is a real “singers’ song” with a good melody. You feel its melodic quality because it seems to demand an expansive treatment even though it is not a huge composition.
ONR 22: Arthur Siegel (1990)

WHEN THE JOURNEY'S OVER

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1960, intended for Later Than Spring  (which later became Sail Away )
Unused
Unpubl. MS
The pacing and style of this is rather similar to ‘When Did You First Discover You Were Different?’, another unused song from Later Than Spring. Only music (and three verses of lyrics – see BD) for a refrain exist.  It’s a standard sixteen-bar four-phrase construction, and of no remarkable interest or impact in either its music or its lyrics.  Sorry, but there it is.

WHEN WE WERE GIRLS TOGETHER

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(1922)
London Calling! 1924 (3rd Edn.) (Maisie Gay & A. W. Baskombe)
Unpubl. MS, written in the same early pre-Elsie April hand as for ‘Temperamental Honeymoon’, etc. (q.v.), hence the dating suggested above.
This is another MS which shows a very early hand for the music, with the lyrics added in later in Norman Hackforth’s hand. The inference must be that the piece was pulled out of the drawer of obscurity at some point during the 40’s or 50’s for possible inclusion in cabaret shows or the NCSB.
The piece is a point number about the ways of “roguish and winsome and naughty and gay” girls – very much Maisie Gay’s typical characterisation - with both verse and refrain sections in gentle waltz tempo, and all falling into predictable 8-bar phrases, musically similar to something such as the ‘Eton Boating Song’. The refrain is slightly extended from the standard 4-phrase structure, to five phrases.
There are two verses and three refrains of good comedy lyrics, with pleasing melodic lines which presage the shape of ‘Bright Young People’ (q.v.) of seven or eight years later.

WHEN WOMEN COME INTO THEIR OWN
See Appendix 1.c

WHEN YOU COME HOME ON LEAVE
Words by Noël Coward, Music by NC and Max Darewski

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August 1917 (Manchester)
unused
MUSIC LOST
lyric unearthed by Mander and Mitchenson, 1966, (BD p.203); no trace of publication.
This song seems to have been at least partly a shared composition. Coward wrote to his mother from Manchester: "I wrote the lyric yesterday after breakfast, I hummed it to [Max Darewski] in the Midland lounge at 12 o'clock, we at once rushed up to his private room, and he put harmonies to it, there were some other people there, when they sung it once or twice, Max leapt off the piano stool and danced for joy and said it was going to take London by storm. We are putting the verse to music this morning..." The song was a patriotic Great War number which owed not a little to the sentiments of Ivor Novello's hit 'Keep the Home Fires Burning' of the year before.

WHEN YOU WANT ME

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DISCOGRAPHY:

Jan. 1961, Jamaica [NCD, 29 Jan. 61]
Sail Away, 1961 (Grover Dale and Patricia Harty)
Sep.publ.
NCG2
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard
NCR
Calypso love-duet ballad. This song has a firmly consonant melody formed from scale and arpeggio fragments set to a firm rhythmic pastiche calypso. The introductory and closing phrases, set to a repeated note followed by a string of descending semitones with slightly varied endings, have a certain wistful bluesiness and give dramatic coherence to an otherwise guileless piece. Little passages of descending semitones in the melody was rather a feature of NC’s compositions of this period, and here it works rather better than in some other instances.
The refrain main phrases shift chords around above a pedal Eb with the calypso moto perpetuo. The middle section of the refrain, which moves into Gminor (from Eb) has fast and pleasing harmonic movement and provides a good contrast with the harmonically static “main” phrases which surround it. It is interesting to note that, at this relatively late stage of NC’s composing life, here is a song whose final phrases make a most deliberate and repeated feature of his “fingerprint” chord of the dominant 5#7.
NCR 43: + pno. acc. ?Werner (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Grover Dale & Patricia Hardy (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: Grover Dale & Sheila Forbes (1962)
ONR 07: Elaine Delmar & Derek Waring (Cowardy Custard, 1972)
ONR 28: Barbara Lea acc. Keith Ingham (1999)

WHERE ARE THE SONGS WE SUNG?

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1937)
Operette, 1938 (Peggy Wood)
Sep.publ.
NCSB
The music appears as a nostalgic love-song number in Act I Sc.8, and is also used for the 'Finale’ of "The Model Maid" show-within-a-show section at the very end of Act I. In its original context it is a girl’s song, spliced into a scene where Rozanne, wooed by Nigel, is remembering her own over-ardent youthful attachments and (maybe) not taking Nigel’s suggestions of current interest entirely seriously. At the close of the song he kisses her and holds her in his arms for a moment, before she gives a little laugh and disengages herself, saying: “Darling, this is all very silly and the soup’s getting cold!”. Talk about setting up sentiment and then puncturing the mood completely!
This is a very good romantic slow waltz, much stronger a piece really than Operette’s main love-waltz, ‘Dearest Love’. It has a moderato verse section, marked “very legato”, which is a small masterpiece of expansive writing, with some unusual phrase-lengths (the first is five bars long) and lyric rhythms which alternate bars of flowing quavers with bars of slightly unexpected stasis. I have always enjoyed the moment when, set to the lyrics “like organ music in a sunny street, so sweetly flat, so sadly tender” the music moves, effectively, from a Gminor7 chord to the same but with a flattened fifth (Db) with the word “flat”. True, it is not the only lyric to this progression but it is certainly an apt coalescence. There is one glorious chord-shift (from a fairly static F, into Db) towards the end under the words “when love again rides by”, which is most gently thrilling. The whole Verse demands very fine judgements of pacing and rubato if the quaver-passage bars are not to sound rushed. (Incidentally, there are two sets of verse lyrics, the second is not in NCL but is printed in NCSB.)
Something of the same considerations apply to the Refrain, which also has one passage of quavers within an otherwise rhythmically slow and smooth melody, which just has to be given time to speak. It’s a strong, long-breathed melodic theme which has the Coward hallmarks of wide rising and falling intervals – an octave upwards in the first phrase and a seventh downwards in the second. There’s a nice overlap between the end of the second lyric phrase and the start of the third musical phrase. From a harmonic point of view the refrain is not terribly adventurous, each phrase being set to the same series of four standard-pattern consonant chords, but this makes the final phrase, where it does move (even to a touch of D major, out of an F major tonality), all the more effective.
A song of nostalgic sentiment, certainly, but of quite a personal kind, too: one feels that here NC was speaking what he himself felt, and the song becomes a sort of summing up of the broad affinity he clearly felt for the musical forms and styles of a previous generation.
Peggy Wood on OCR 10 is nicely judged, and the gentle orchestrations don't intrude. OCR 10 is also noteworthy for the introduction of a lusher, strings-based orchestration for the second refrain (Frankel's own? – it was not used with NCR 19 although it's the same orchestra).
NCR 19: + HM Th. Orch. cond. F.M. Collinson (Feb 1938)
ONR131: George Melachrino + Carroll Gibbons & the
Savoy Orpheans (1 Mar 1938)
ONR132: Denny Dennis + Roy Fox orch. (1938)
OCR 10: Peggy Wood + orch. cond. Frankel (25 Mar 1938)
NCR 30: + orch. cond. Mantovani (1947)
ONR 32a: Harry Noble acc. Stuart Ross (1953)
ONR 14: Joan Sutherland + orch. (1966)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)
ONR 25: David Kernan, Liz Robertson, Louise Gold acc. Jason Carr & Paul Bateman (1994)

WHERE SHALL I FIND HIM (HER)

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(Verse section,1946)
(Rest 1959?) included in drafts for Later Than Spring, and eventually part of
Sail Away, 1961 (Patricia Harty)
Sep.publ.
The start of the longish verse section, heard on all the recordings below and set to the words “Oh, darling Mother, this was a mistake. I can never do the job” is almost note-for-note lifted from Mr Strirling's BIRTHDAY TOAST from P1860. The music does not really make very convincing melodic phrases, as it has a strongly conversational structure. A later and newly-composed verse section was printed with the sheet music, possibly because the performed verse was too lyrically tied to context to make a good general song. In the printed verse with different lyrics the music is much more melodic and lyrical.
While there is nothing to complain of, exactly, in the refrain, as a whole the song could be considered a bit listless. The lyric is reather anodyne – what could be more ordinary than a phrase such as “Suddenly, suddenly, maybe we’ll meet, on an ordinary day, on some ordinary street”? – and to my mind the music also reflects this, with rather square and melodically repetitious four-bar phrases.
It may be a competent but unexciting song, but it does have a certain simple charm and is at least graceful. One’s opinion should perhaps not be guided by OCR 18, because her voice was itself a bit anodyne. There is greater charm in NCR 45.
In the reprise it had new lyrics “Maybe I’ve found her” [see BD].
NCR 43: acc. Werner? (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Patricia Harty (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: Sheila Forbes (1962)

WHY AM I ALWAYS ALONE?

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1960, intended for Later Than Spring (which later became Sail Away )
unused
Unpubl. MS
This was sketched out to be done by the “Mrs Wentworth-Brewster character”, Polly, recently widowed. A single slowish waltz refrain survives in a very scrappy MS giving no lyric and only the bare outline of harmonies. It is not a terribly well-developed tune, having too-short phrase-lengths combined with too-long holding notes at their ends, and with decidedly repetitious elements.

WHY DO THE WRONG PEOPLE TRAVEL?

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DISCOGRAPHY:

Sept/Oct 1957 (Bermuda) [NCD]
(in draft for Later Than Spring )
Sail Away, 1961 (Elaine Stritch)
Sep.Publ.
STA
NCG1
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard
NCR
At its origin NC himself described this as "a rattling good point number", which is not putting it too strongly.
The verse section is meanderingly conversational in character, but with good, long lyric/melodic lines which “go” somewhere despite relative melodic banality. The refrain is something of a tour de force of comedy point-number writing. Stritch thought that every really good comic song has a thumping good tune behind it, and this song would certainly seem to bear out her theory. It moves, harmonically too, through five long phrases of melodic pattern A,B,C,A,E+extensions, and has the reach to be able to develop ideas both lyric and melodic along the way. Stritch is very much associated with the performance of this number, it having been so well-suited to her acerbic style of delivery. Some may think, with some justification, that she sounds like a corncrake, but she turns in a cracker of a live performance on ONR 133, partly due to brilliant accompanying orchestrations and partly to excellent psychological management of the audience’s expectations. She shows how a touch of theatricality can lift a good song into high performance art. Hers and MD Rob Bowman’s whole construct is geared to effective dramatic delivery. It is not ineffective in other artists’ hands either and will always make a good cabaret song – as shown by Steve Ross on ONR 5a – but it is not a song to be attempted without some fairly strong chacterisation, and without enough “bite” it will always sound a bit flat.
NCR 43: + pno. acc. ?Werner (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Elaine Stritch (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: Elaine Stritch (1962)
ONR133:Elaine Stritch + Rob Bowman orch. (2002)
ONR 05a: Steve Ross (2004)

WHY DO YOU PASS ME BY? (Music by Charles Trenet)
See Appendix 1.a

WHY DOES LOVE GET IN THE WAY?

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(1949)
Ace of Clubs, 1950 (Pat Kirkwood)
Sep.Publ. (1951)
NCSB
It is tempting to zero in on two NCD entries, for 2 April 49 (Jamaica) and 17 August 49 (London), talking respectively about NC being inspired by “a new and lovely tune” and “I got a new tune at the piano, quite a charming one”, as being possible points of origin.
This is a very unusual sort of almost-torch-song, though one done with NC’s usual half-detached, impersonal take. It is not a song about the loved-for but unavailable other, except explicitly in its dramatic context: it was written as a song for Pinkie Leroy, the Club’s star floorshow performer, after she has quarrelled with the young sailor Harry. But in its lyrics alone it is rather more general and oblique, being the song of a wounded heart, frightened and upset as much as anything else at the prospect of finding itself in love. As such, it is a song with very strong autobiographical resonances to its composer.
What is particularly unusual is the musical setting, which is, in its refrain, a sustained rhumba with all the confident melodic sweep of Porter’s ‘Begin the Beguine’. A short confusingly-keyshifting intro leads to the Verse section, an 8-bar colla voce of halting, bar-long passages in flowing quavers. The music tonalities move quickly through F minor, F, G, C minor and F again in the space of two 4-bar musical phrases packed with sinuously chromatic harmonisations. All this reflects in a musical way at least a sense of confusion.
The rhythmic refrain also shares some disorientating and/or disquieting elements, not the least of which is the triplet riff at the end of the first phrase (on “get in the way”), repeated three times in sequence during the next part of the line, and also elsewhere. In itself it has an “arresting” effect and emphasizes the words, but it is also set to a darkly diminished chord based on Cb (B) instead of a “normal” dominant chord based on Bb. In contrast to the melodically static main theme phrase, the second phrase is melodically nimble, but introduces a mordant flattening to itself as it moves into the relative minor key, and then does another confusing keyshifting, moving from D to touch G7, Fminor7 and Bb7 in its last bar-and-a-half. The ‘A’ phrase then returns but is changed harmonically and melodically in such a way as to throw the music forward. The final phrase starts with two bars of parallel chords descending in semitones and then touches the key of Abminor before returning to restate the punchline in the home key of Eb. A second complete verse-and refrain follows after another diminished chord. All these tonal and melodic elements add up to mean that this is no ordinary rhumba but music with inbuilt tensions, discomforts and confusions.
In performance, I think it rewards being done with a catch in the throat. This pained element is well caught by Pat Kirkwood on OCR 14.
OCR 14: Pat Kirkwood (1950)
NCR 34: + C de P orch. cond. Simone acc. Hackforth (1951)
ONR 16: Carmen McRae (1974)
ONR 27: Richard Conrad (1998)

WHY IS IT THE WOMAN WHO PAYS?

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31 December 1953, Jamaica [NCD]
After the Ball, 1954 (Pam Marmont, Lois Green, Marion Grimaldi)
Unpubl. MS
The idea for this song came to NC from a phrase in one of the letters in Emily Lutyens' book Blessed Girl.
This is a fast-ish but relaxed 4/4 point number, similar in musical feeling to ‘Green Carnation’ from Bitter Sweet. NC himself referred to it as "a really good Cowardesque trio" [NCD] - and as usual he was right. The theme of this song is “why is it that the men have all the fun and irresponsibility, while we women have to suffer in silent rectitude?” In other words, they are having a good bitch about their menfolk. It is couched elegantly, of course, but with a touch of world-weariness. A song of interesting sentiments, which are probably still true.
For a start, it has good long-phrased lyrics which abound with delightful rhyming (e.g. 'contumely' with 'gloomily' and ‘what utter hell it is’ with ‘infidelities’) and some neat “interior” rhymes. To back this up, the music of the refrain has good structure as well as melodic and harmonic direction.
A 12-bar colla voce verse in two-bar phrases leads to the refrain, which then becomes steadily rhythmic. This starts in 8-bar phrases and has four melodic sections, during which the length of phrases is extended, roughly thus: A,B,A+2 bars,C=12bars,D=12bars,E=12bars+extensions.
It has to be said that there are a couple of moments in this long, ambling refrain where the sense of harmonic direction is a bit unsure: there are just too many misleading chords and/or progressions which do not end up quite where they seemed to be leading to, but this is an impression within a firmly structured and themed whole, which is also full of rewards. The opening refrain tune is a bit melodically reminiscent of ‘Auntie Jessie’, thus with a touch of simplicity about it, and this is true of much else of the melodic line. There is plenty of comfortable settling on or passing through consonant or related harmonies, some nicely specific pianistic accompaniment (especially in the ‘C’ phrase), and some nice “crunchy” harmonisations including a bar or two of sideways chromatic slippage (in the ‘E’ phrase) which is typical of Norman Hackforth’s own compositions (he was the amanuensis). I think NH also introduced NC to the concept of a dominant or major 7th chord with added 9ths and 13ths, much in evidence here. In fact, the whole harmonic setting of the song is full of rich and busy chordal interest. I wonder how much of its specifics would ever have been precisely reproduced in publication?
One might feel that the After The Ball score would have been more successful with more numbers like this and fewer in the meanderingly lush style. It is a neglected song, due to having a character specificosity which makes it rather tied to its oringinal production, and some awkwardly “period” lyrics; but it could still be suitable for some revue-style entertainment, and certainly deserves revisiting.
OCR 15: Chorus (1954)
ONR 00: Ladies’ Chorus (two tracks) (2005)

WHY MUST THE SHOW GO ON?

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(1956)
There is no evidence to suggest that the song was written for Together With Music (22 Oct 55), as has been asserted elsewhere.
NCR 40: November 1956
Sep.publ. 1957
NCG2
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard
NCR
Tub-thumping cabaret song. This was, if you like, the “adult” version of the previous year’s success, ‘What’s Going To Happen To The Tots?’, and it epitomizes the period of the American NC renaissance.
The correspondence in metre and rhythm between the two songs is obvious, and the musical style so typical of NC’s comedy manner that it needs no description: this is the sort of thing that gets parodied whenever someone wants to do “a Noël Coward number”. The two pieces also share a certain tone of voice: they are angry and moralistic diatribes, piling up absurd pictures of louche and degenerate behaviour in much the same way as in earlier works such as ‘Marvellous Party’, but with much more waspishness and bitterness and less affection.
Any hard thought about the phrase-structure of this song quickly gets bogged down in hopeless detail – it is enough to say that this song has inbuilt qualities for the effective delivery of rapier-sharp lyrics. It is easily as strong a total concept as ‘Mrs Worthington’, and may well have the edge on complexity. The nuts and bolts can be summed up by explaining that there is not a single phrase in the refrain which is musically simple: there are three main themes, but all of them either use extensions which build from their own material, or else re-use something from a previous phrase. Sometimes both things at once. Like ‘Mrs Worthington’ it is a song which grabs the attention of its audience at the start and doesn’t let it go – and doesn’t let it go – and doesn’t let it go, through two verses and three densely-lyric refrains. You cannot do this by lyric alone.
The date-order of events proves that NC clearly had enough clout with his publishers, even in the US and just based on the original promotion of NCR 40, to get the song published separately as sheet music.
This song is among the top thirty Coward numbers in terms of current royalties earning potential (see Appendix 3).
NCR 40: +orch./acc. Peter Matz (1956)
ONR 20: Lewis Fiander & Patricia Hodge (1986)
ONR 30: Peter Greenwell (1995)

WIFE OF AN ACROBAT (THE)

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1932)
Words and Music, 1932 (Ivy St Helier)
publ.Vocal Score
This came after ‘Something To Do With Spring’, in the middle of the second half of WAM. In the Play Parade series the order of this piece and the following ‘The Younger Generation’ are reversed, which may reflect something that happened.
There is one verse section and four refrains, the Vocal Score putting the verse after the first refrain. This is a piece which surely depended to a big degree on the comic skills of its performer to lift its artlessness into the realms of effective performance art, since the music gives but limited rewards and is not capable of doing so on its own merits. The lyrics are perfectly acceptable but not in themselves hugely comic, and the melodic lines go nowhere much and are tediously repetitious in the final phrase. I’m sure it worked well at the time. Only someone like Hermione Gingold (ONR22) could get away with reviving it!
ONR134: Joyce Grenfell + Mantovani Orch. (1947)
ONR 22: Hermione Gingold (1968)

WILLY

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May 1945
Sigh No More, 1945 (Tom Linden, Cyril Ritchard and Madge Elliot)
Unpubl. MSS
There are two MSS in the archives, one by Robb Stewart which lacks any sense of neatness, and which was obviously re-drafted by Hackforth.  Quite why it was redone is conjecture, as it seems most unlikely that the “song” was being considered for inclusion in NCSB, for which NH clearly re-drafted some material. The origin of Graham Payn's nickname "Little Lad" is taken from this song (see CL, p.235-236).
Unpublished Diaries extracts show a concerted spurt of effortful work on this number 21-25 May 1945 – NC “flogged away all day” at it, and there was relief when it was finished!
This is an impossible piece to describe or categorize, as it is not really a “song” at all, rather a long, episodic musical sketch.  It is an entire scene set to music, in which choirs of good and bad angels, sometimes singly and sometimes in chorus, suggest to the boy Willy the moral restraints and temptations which litter his path.  At the start ‘Willy’ would seem to be being addressed as a young boy or adolescent, though by the end we are firmly talking about opera-hats and ladies on ones arm in Piccadilly.
The music is worth getting to know, a fascinating foretaste of the frequently-keyshifting, lushly-harmonised episodic work that was to characterise Pacific 1860 and After The Ball.  The only way you can do that is by ordering up a copy of the MS from the publisher – so make sure to insist on the very neat NH MS, and be prepared to pay through the nose for it, as it amounts to 27 pages of MS.

WOMAN OF THE WORLD
See Appendix 1.b

WOMAN WHO PAYS (THE)
See WHY IS IT THE WOMAN WHO PAYS?

WONDERFUL
See CORONATION CHORALE

WORLD WEARY

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1928)
This Year of Grace (USA prodn. only) 1928 (Beatrice Lillie)
Also said to have been used in All Clear (UK) Dec.39, but no refs. to support this
Cabaret performances, 1951-55
Together With Music, 1955
Sep. publ. only in 1951/52 (see Appendix 2.b)
NCSB
SA2
NCG1
NCR
This is a reflective, wistful slow ballad, which illustrates its title all too well with an effective mix of bluesiness and highly descriptive harmonic touches in its verse, and a refrain of restrained charm.
The verse section is quasi-recitational, with very obvious blues-y melodic touches in its first two phrases, the second of which also features the 5#7 chord, and a “classic” NC passage of semitonally descending parallel chords under the words “buildings seem to grow so high”. This sort of NC harmonic setting was beautifully parodied by Cole Porter in his song ‘What Am I To Do?’ (see Appendix 1.e). The refrain is a much gayer affair after the verse’s introspective mood, and falls into a major-key, 8-bar phrase structure which is all simplicity and lightness, though not without melodic and harmonic direction. The phrases show a lot of development of material, with long lyric lines, in a form approximating to A+A, B+C, D+D, A+E. The ‘D+D’ section forms the “middle 8” passage, and consists of bouncy phraselets of three beats syncopated across the song’s steady 4-beat, also “classic” NC revue-style of the 20’s-30’s.
NCR 37 demonstrates a well-paced refrain, and good orchestrations (which were used as the basis for NCR 38), and is also a nice mix of orchestra combining with rhythmic piano accompaniment, especially in the second refrain. ONR 13 is probably the only one to include the rare second verse lyrics. Of the recent recordings, while proving that this is a true melodist’s song ONR 23 suffers from an unsympathetic piano accompaniment. A self-accompaniment in a very modern jazz style on ONR 136a is a much more rewarding stylistic setting, though Rodney Bennett’s choice of tempo for the refrains sometimes leads to slightly gabbled words.
NCR 04: pno. acc. Carroll Gibbons (1929)
NCR 11: (in medley) + Leo Reisman Orch. (1933)
ONR 32a: Harry Noble acc. Stuart Ross (1953)
NCR 37: + Wally Stott Orch. & pno. acc. Hackforth (1954)
NCR 38: + C. Hayes Orch./acc. Peter Matz (Jun 1955)
OCR 16: NC+ P. Matz orch.(Together With Music Oct.1955)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)
ONR136: Sarah Walker acc. Roger Vignoles (1982)
ONR135: Steve Ross (1990)
ONR 28: Barbara Lea acc. Keith Ingham (1999)
ONR 13: Dominic Alldis + combo (2000)
ONR 23: Ian Bostridge acc. Jeffrey Tate (2002)
ONR 136a: Richard Rodney Bennett (2005)

WOULD YOU LIKE TO STICK A PIN IN MY BALLOON?

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DISCOGRAPHY:

(1949)
Ace of Clubs, 1950 (Act I closer)
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
Unpubl MSS (complete) - an unbelievably scrappy pencil MS by Robb Stewart & one re-done neatly by Norman Hackforth.
This was the Act I closing item, and forms part of the “club floorshow”: deliberately breaking the tension of the previous scene. The showgirls, in their leggy costumes, enter from each side of the stage carrying coloured balloons and pins, and circulate among the customers at the nightclub tables, singing shrilly and inviting men in the audience to pop their balloons with louche suggestiveness. As such, it is an excellent pastiche of a sort of music-hall or seaside-pier comedy point number. It consists of a refrain only and has an unremarkable foursquare standard 4-phrase structure; one imagines certain repetition of musical material in any production setting.
Not, you might think, necessarily the strongest musical way to close the first half of a show with, but it is almost sure-firedly funny in presentation, so at least they’d have gone out chuckling.
ONR 07: Una Stubbs (Cowardy Custard, 1972)