J & K Titles

J and K

JAPANESE CYCLE
see Appendix 1.c

JAPANESE LOVE SONG

ORIGIN:
USE:
SOURCE:
NOTES:

(c.1925?)
unused
unpubl. MS. (For lyrics see BD)
The origins of this song lie at least in part in an earlier lyric of around 1919 (See CHINESE CYCLE on Appendix 1.c) for which no matching music has been found. A complete lyric for the more extended c.1925 working was separately preserved in the archives from the music manuscript. At any rate, the music was written out only after the advent of Elsie April as amanuensis (1923).
It consists of a Japanese-style pentatonic four-square melody coloured with parallel fourths set to pretty predictable harmonies. Again, there is nothing instrinsically wrong with this song, but its topicality (the craze for exotic orientalism) was soon past and there’s nothing particularly exciting revealed when words and music are married together.

JAPANESE SPIES

ORIGIN:
USE:


SOURCE:


(1945)
The song appeared in the Manchester preview of Sigh No More (Cyril Ritchard and Madge Elliot), but had been cut before the show reached London.
MUSIC LOST
Lyrics publ. in BD

JE T'AIME
subtitled SECOND WALTZ

ORIGIN:
USE:
SOURCE:
NOTES:

(1937?)
Unused
Unpubl. MS. Lyrics in BD
This is one of three MSS - First, Second and Third Waltzes, whose tentative dating given above is on account of the MSS for all of them being discovered originally in an envelope with manuscript material from Operette which had been returned to NC's office from Chappell & Co. The other pieces are titled I GAVE MY HEART AWAY and THERE'S NO MORE TO SAY ABOUT LOVE. All three are also marked 'German Love' and bear page number references for an unknown script; but there is no obvious "placing" of these pieces to tie in with any known or planned production ideas.
This is a rather well-developed waltz melody of pleasing breadth and integrity, though of no great passion or great lyric setting and lacking any subsequent development beyond its obvious 32-bar statement. A case of unfulfilled musical potential. In my opinion it is probably as strong a waltz main theme as anything which subsequently featured in post-war shows.

JESSIE HOOPER

ORIGIN:
USE:


SOURCE:
NOTES:

Part of sketch A Scotch Interlude (1924)
Charlot's Revue (As Seen in America) Jan 17 1925. (Not incl. in Charlot's 1924 Revue, which was the UK production before it went transatlantic)
Later used in Café de Paris cabarets, 1954.
Unpubl. MS
The archives preserve an Elsie April MS from its origin date; but this song is also one of half-a-dozen or so items in the archives which seems to have been written down in the early 40's (before Robb Stewart and Norman Hackforth) by an unknown amanuensis. Among the other items so prepared were FORBIDDEN FRUIT and TOURING DAYS, and it is possible that this indicates a session of pulling things off the shelf when need arose during WW2 on account of an increasing demand for NC's solo performances. According to a sketched running-order in the Hackforth archives, the song was certainly planned for inclusion in the 1954 Café de Paris cabarets along with SPINNING SONG, IRISH SONG and PICowardy CustardOLA MARINA. It is possible that this song was reverted to as second choice to OLD SCOTTISH AIR (q.v.) as part of NC's 'These You Have Loathed' feature.
It is hard to understand the point of this song, although the Verse section is an obvious Scottish melody pastiche. From its lyrics, which deal with Jessie Hooper’s execution or perhaps suicide, it does not exactly seem to be a comedy song; but the humour may be very oblique and (later) suited to NC’s own particular dead-pan style of delivery - we know how a world of suggestive meaning could be brought to a song performance by a beautifully-timed raised eyebrow. Anyway, any obvious effect and intent of the piece remain a little unclear.

JEWELS AND PERFUMES

ORIGIN:
USE:
SOURCE:

NOTES:



(1927)
Cochran's 1928 Revue (as This Year of Grace! was known in Manchester)
SOURCE: M&M (p.178)
MUSIC & LYRICS LOST
Not even a lyric has survived, so we know only what M&M gives: "Grand Production Number", for Maisie Gay and Mr Cochran's Young Ladies, with an "announcer". It seems to be a pastiche on an amateur grand production number from the English provinces. So far the sources reveal no way of establishing whether the item was musical accompaniment to dancing, or music with lyrics.

JOAN OF ARC
See MIDNIGHT MATINEE

JOSEPHINE

ORIGIN:



USE:
SOURCE:


NOTES:




DISCOGRAPHY:

The idea possibly as early as 1946, since a lyric intended for Pacific 1860 titled 'Ursuline' seems to share exactly the same rhythmic structure as the refrain of 'Josephine' [see BD]. The final song was composed in Jamaica, April 1949 [NCD]
Ace of Clubs, 1950 (Part of Club Floorshow) (Pat Kirkwood)
Sep.Publ. (1951)
NCSB
STA
Fast waltz revue/comedy song, which has more than a shade of the music-hall in its conception. The nightclub singer gives a vignette of Josephine and Napoleon's relationship through two verses and three refrains, all of them of elegant lyric wit. Musically, also, the refrain is tautly-constructed in three well-balanced sixteen-bar phrases which have an effective and memorable melody and harmonies that rest pleasingly in the dominant and mediant keys along the way.
NCR 31: + Cambridge Th. orch. cond. Mantovani (3 Jul1950)
OCR 14: Pat Kirkwood + Mantovani orch. (3 Jul 1950)
ONR 05: Bobby Short (1972)
ONR 27: Richard Conrad (1998)

JOURNÉE HEUREUSE
see Appendix 1.c

JOURNEY'S END

ORIGIN:
USE:
SOURCE:
NOTES:

(1932)
Words and Music, 1932 (Marie Francoise) (Act I closer)
Publ.Vocal Score
A burlesque on Sheriff's play of the same name
Contents:
1) Announcement (see separate entry)
2) Yodelling Song
3) Kleine Pupchen
4) Te Quiero
5) German Prisoners' Dance (no lyrics)
6) A Gondola on the Rhine
7) Love and War
It is really one sketch, with almost non-stop musical accompaniment. All of these are musical pastisches of one sort or another. In the Announcement it is explained that the author has “decided on a plan/ To utilise as many aliens as he can”. For example, the Yodelling Song is sung by ‘Marie Francoise’ “in national peasant costume”, and the German Prisoners “execute a violent slapping dance, laughing merrily”, etc., etc.". ‘Te Quiero’ is a pastiche Spanish melody with a certain poise. The most substantial and least derivative item is ‘Kleine Pupchen’, though even this harks back to something slightly hackneyed from an earlier time.

JUST PEOPLE
(IF WE COULD ONLY BE JUST PEOPLE)

ORIGIN:
USE:

SOURCE:
NOTES:











DISCOGRAPHY:

(1962)
intended for The Girl Who Came to Supper 1963, but did not survive beyond Boston (Sean Scully and Tracy Rogers)
Unpubl. MS
The point of this number is the teenaged King Nicholas, who having tasted life on the streets of London (as it were) bemoans the fact that his life is usually circumscribed by protocol: “If we could just employ an ordinary day/ Furbishing up our own front parlour,/ If we could just enjoy an ordinary play/ Rather than an all-star gala.” The lyrics preserve an introductory Verse section which was a casualty even before Boston, and music for this is not included in the surviving MS.
There’s more right with this piece than wrong, and the cut was one caused by the cutting of the part of Princess Louisa (also applies to ‘Hey Nonny No’, qv). The early-80’s BBC radio production of the show reinserted the song as a duet for Nicholas and Ada Cockle, where it worked well. It has a certain light charm and grace, the main melody built on a lightly ascending scale pattern. The piece says something worth saying, but it won’t travel well outside its context.
NCR 46: pianist unknown (1963)

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS
see ALLEGRO VIVACE (London Morning)
(Separate title from THREE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS (q.v.))

KA TAHUA
see SAMOLAN SONG

KINROSS HOME
see IN WHICH WE SERVE

KISS ME

ORIGIN:
USE:
SOURCE:

NOTES:












DISCOGRAPHY:

(1928)
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Ivy St. Helier)
Sep. publ.
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
Slow waltz aria. And a most effective pastiche, which no one hearing it in isolation could conceive as having been written by the same songwriter who gave us 'Mrs Worthington' and her sophisticated lyric stablemates.
This is one of the outstanding examples of a Noël Coward pastiche song which is so good it outshines almost any original of the genre (slow waltz aria from e.g. a Lehar or Edward German operetta). That he manages to give it suggestive enough lyrics and a role in the drama which mimic a louche Parisian nightclub song is something of a double coup.
An alternative French lyric refrain starts 'Je t'aime, tes baisers m'ont grisés...' [see BD p.113] In fact, there is a complete French publication of this song (I am uncertain of the authorship of these particular complete lyrics) in the wake of the French production of Bitter Sweet, ‘Au Temps des Valses’, entitled ‘Abandonnée’ (see Appendix 2b, item 8d).
Both Julia D'Alba and Rosemary Ashe are first class in this, but ONR 04 is a bit disfigured by intrusively clever orchestrations.
ONR 08: (in selection) Jack Hylton orchestra (1929)
ONR 02: Susan Hampshire + orch. (1961)
ONR 03: Julie Dawn + orch. (1962)
ONR 04: Julia D'Alba + orch. (1969)
ONR 01: Rosemary Ashe + New Sadler's Wells Orch. (1988)

KLEINE PUPCHEN
see JOURNEY'S END