G & H Titles

G

GARDENS (THE)
See PUBLIC GARDENS

GEORGIE
See Appendix 1.e

GERMAN PRISONERS' DANCE
See JOURNEY'S END

GET OUT THOSE OLD RECORDS
See Appendix 1.a

GINGER UP
See DUKE OF YORK'S

GIPSY MELODY

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(1937)
intended for Operette (1938), but cut in Manchester before the London opening
Then in Pacific 1860, 1946 (Sylvia Cecil & chorus)
Publ.Vocal Score (of P1860)
Pastiche zigeunerliede aria, the first main item in Act III.
The verse sections are an effective piece of writing, starting with the mordently exotic in C# minor and moving on to fine, long-breathed vocal lines in Db, with chorus decorations. The refrain (in E) is also a fine tune despite its obvious pastiche elements. It ends up sounding like a very real slow tango.
NCR 19 is an anomaly, since it (songs from the score of Operette) was all recorded even before the Manchester opening. By the time the show reached London not only had the song been cut but Benjamin Frankel replaced Collinson as MD.
NCR 19: + orch. cond. F.M. Collinson (1938)

GIRL I AM LEAVING IN ENGLAND TODAY, THE

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(1924)
Charlot's 1924 Revue (Maisie Gay)
Charlot's Revue of 1926 (New York) (Beatrice Lillie)
Part of the sketch AFTER DINNER MUSIC
MUSIC LOST
Lyrics in BD
BD notes a performance direction that "this should be sung with a decided English syncopation, jerky movements, generally off the beat". Maisie Gay presented the three songs in this sketch as a burlesque of a "third-rate music hall act", and this one in particular as "a slightly exaggerated impression of Norah Bayes".

GIRL WITH THE DULL BROWN EYE
See Appendix 1.a

GIRLS OF THE C.I.V. (THE)

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(1931)
Cavalcade, 1931 (Act I Sc.4 - chorus)
Unpubl. MS
This is a pastiche of a song "from a typical musical comedy of the period" (around 1900). (It is exactly the time of the relief of Mafeking.) This is the "opening number" of the play-within-a-play, Mirabelle, which features in Part 1 Scene 4 of Cavalcade. The C.I.V. girls, dressed "rakishly" and described as "bouncing", celebrate their inclusion in the Boer War with a sprightly little march refrain in 6/8 time. (Clearly NC felt there was something a little ridiculous in women in uniforms parading about, not to mention the missionary instinct of imperial womanhood.)
Other parts of Mirabelle which follow are: LOVER OF MY DREAMS, FUN OF THE FARM [sic, in playscript] and FINALE (q.v.)

GIVE ME THE KINGSTON BYPASS

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(1952)
The Globe Revue, 1952 (Graham Payn)
Sep.Publ.
Solo ballad. The Kingston Pypass was one of the first new dual-carriageway roads to be built in Britain, and the song celebrates an ordinary man's lust for the open road in a variety of swish automobiles. Like TIME AND AGAIN from the same era, it is a mature song of elegant construction with dovetailing lyrics and melody. The trouble is that both title and lyric contents are so much of their precise time that the song is a bit irrelevant beyond.
Was it ever going to be popular enough a song as to merit its separate publication? Or is this perhaps an instance of NC knowing that it was a well-constructed song and wanting it to be published regardless of sales?
ONR 16a: Courtney Kenney (2001)

GO SLOW JOHNNY

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(1961)
Sail Away, 1961 (James Hurst)
Sep.Publ.
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
Solo ballad. Johnny sings this after a brush-off from Mimi. But dramatically it is perhaps a little too upbeat a number to swing into quite so boldly after the emotional tension of what has happened in the play. Therefore it doesn't come across in context as a very strong number, and the relative lack of melodic movement at the start of the main theme does not help engage ones interest. However, it has life and energy and a certain pleasing melodic development as it progresses.
OCR 18: James Hurst (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: David Holliday (1962)

GO, I BEG YOU GO

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(melodic theme) partly from 1943/44 (see below)
otherwise 1953/54
After the Ball, 1954 (Mary Ellis)
MS Vocal Score
Duet aria for Mrs Erlynne and Lady Windermere, Act II Sc.1 of the original pre-London (pre-revision) touring production; Lady W & Mrs E meet each other at Lord Darlington's house, and Mrs E urges Lady W to go back to her husband.
The start of the refrain sets the title words to the opening notes of the earlier-written but not then otherwise used THERE WILL ALWAYS BE (qv), and the note-pattern is then raised in pitch and extended twice to create a lengthy arioso phrase. The original was slow and serene; here the music is developed into restlessness, if not turbulence. In fact it becomes rather a good flowing romantic number. There are hints of NEVER AGAIN in the recit-like middle section.
In the second part of Mrs E's song the dropping 7th is effective; but the duet as a whole is very operatic, and goes on rather too long for dramatic success in this context.
This number provides the second example of NC recycling material written during the war years into this show (the other is LIGHT IS THE HEART).
A later section of this same musical scene is titled DEMAND NO PITY (q.v.)

GOLDENEYE CALYPSO
See Appendix 1.b

GONDOLA ON THE RHINE (A)
See JOURNEY'S END

GOOD EVENING, LADY WINDERMERE

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(1953)
After the Ball, 1954 (Act II No.9b)
Unpubl. MS (not in the MS Vocal Score)
The item was cut before the show reached London, but 14 bars of music remained in the revised version which was known as MRS ERLYNNE'S ENTRANCE . Twelve bars of the same music were used at the conclusion of the original Act II Sc.1 for an unsatisfactory MEN'S GOODNIGHT SONG, which came after the denouement regarding the fan, and which was dropped (the number, not the fan) before or during the run of the original version.
The upwards and downwards pattern of the melody is pleasing, but by this stage in the show one desperately wants a thumping good tune, and this piece, though pleasing, does not supply anything terribly memorable.
This piece leads into LIGHT IS THE HEART, which originates from 1942. NC's 5#7 cadence chord is much in evidence here.
ONR 00: Mary Illes + ensemble (2005)

GOODBYE, OLD FRIEND
See Appendix 1.b

GRAND TOUR, THE

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Various - Music by NC, adapted and orch. Hershey Kay
A ballet for the Royal Ballet of London (1971)
"Based on a number of famous Coward songs"
(HK also did a similar Gershwin show)
There are discrepancies between the CD printed details and what one hears. The constituent titles are mostly called things like "Pas de Deux". As this was someone else's work we have not considered that this index needs the details; but, for example, the Opening is 'Rule Britannia' followed by 'Mad Dogs'.
ONR 10: City of Prague Philharmonic cond. Robin White (1995)

GRASS IS GREENER, THE

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early June 1960
Music for Sound Film, 1960
Theme music publ. as piano solo to coincide with film's opening
NCG2
The music combined a new theme with various existing NC items which were used as background. The film continues to generate respectable royalty returns (see Appendix 3)

GREEN CARNATION (WE ALL WEAR A ...)

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(1928/29)
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Act III, boys' chorus)
Publ.Vocal Score
Oscar Wilde habitually wore a green carnation, and this floral affectation had been adopted as a badge by the Parisian homosexualists. 'Green Carnation' was also the title of a novel published in 1894 whose chief protagonists were based on the characters of Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas. Despite the fact that Coward's song was a clear lampoon of the manners of the Uranian decadents rather than any current endorsement of their style, the number was cut from both film versions of Bitter Sweet presumably for being too openly camp. This is odd, given that Gilbert and Sullivan had been able to get away with precisely the same thing throughout Patience. Perhaps it was the lyric at the end of the second refrain that did it: "And as we are the reason for the 'nineties' being gay,/ We all wear...".
It is an elegantly-crafted comedy song in swinging 4/4 tempo. ONR 01 sometimes shares the material out between singers, which seems apt. They are also better at finding apt parlando than the singers of ONR 04 and have greater rhythmic integrity in ensemble passages. They also include the full third verse.
NCR 10: (in medley) + Reisman Orch. (1933)
ONR 02: Linden Singers + orch (1961)
ONR 04: John McCarthy Singers (1969)
ONR 01: New Sadler's Wells chorus + orch. (1988)