D & E Titles

D

DAMN GOOD SHOW
See Appendix 1.b

DANCE OF "PRATER GIRLS"

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(1928/29)
Bitter Sweet, 1929 (Act 2)
Vocal Score
on the music of TOKAY (q.v.)

DANCE, LITTLE LADY

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December 1927 [NCA]
This Year of Grace, 1928 (Sonnie Hale, with Lauri Devine)
& NY production (NC, with Florence Desmond)
Sep.Publ.
AES
NCSB
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
NCG1
Revue dance number. NC remembered a supportive meeting with Cochran, when having already offered NC the chance of doing a new revue CBC refused to let the Sirocco fiasco of late November 1927 alter his enthusiasm. "We discussed some of the already formulated ideas for the revue ...[and] I remember leaving his office much cheered and with a new tune whirling round in my head, a tune to which the words 'Dance, Dance, Dance, Little Lady' had resolutely set themselves even before I got home to the piano" [NCA]. He also recalled that "the high tone of moral indignation implicit in the lyric impressed a number of people" [NCSB].
Beverly Nichols seems to have substantiated the only definite known plagiaristic tendencies of Coward's with this composition: 'The first four bars, as Noël once admitted to me, are an unconscious echo of a sentimental song by Liza Lehmann...' [BN] NC later admitted the plagiarism, 'but I didn't realise this when it came into my head, and now it's too late to do anything about it' [quoted in PH]. The Lehmann song in question is an item from 'In a Persian Garden' - a song-cycle for four solo voices (SATB) with piano accompaniment, with words selected from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.
The song's middle 'patter' section shows the influence of black music heard when NC was in the States. Full of internal rhymes, the sequence is virtually an entire Charleston, sandwiched between choruses; and the song's original ending is a brassily direct quotation of one of the themes from Gershwin's 'Rhapsody in Blue'.
The song is among the top thirty most popular NC numbers (see Appendix 3).
NCR 01: Orch. cond./acc. Carroll Gibbons (April 1928)
OCR 04: (in medley) Orch. cond. Ernest Irving (1928)
ONR 08: Ambrose & Mayfair Orch. (1928)
ONR 41: Phil Arnold + Ambrose orch. (1929)
ONR 40: Hildegarde (1939)
ONR 24: Graham Payn + Harry Acres Orch. (1947)
NCR 34: (in medley) acc. Norman Hackforth (1951)
NCR 38: (in medley) acc. Peter Matz (June 1955)
OCR 16: (in medley) NC + orch (Tog. With Music, Oct 1955)
ONR 20: Patricia Hodge & Lewis Fiander (1986)
ONR 18: Michael Law/Piccadilly Dance Orch. (1999)

DANSER, DANSER
See CHARMING, CHARMING

DEAR FRIENDS, FORGIVE ME
See BIRTHDAY TOAST

DEAR LITTLE CAFÉ

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(1928/29)
Bitter Sweet 1929 (Peggy Wood & George Metaxa)
Sep.publ.
BS Vocal Score
A romantic love duet ballad.
The song, incidentally, ought really to be titled 'Sweet Little Café', as nowhere in the lyric does the adjective 'dear' occur. There is also a version published with French lyrics (not by NC) entitled ‘Notre Petit Café (see Appendix 2b, item 8a).
An introductory verse in gentle four-bar phrases alternating between Carl and Sari grows out of their dialogue resolving to leave the tyranny of employment at Schlick's Viennese café to start their own establishment in Budapest. It is notable for a couple of surprising key modulations. The refrain is flowing and restrained, with a touch that lifts the song from the predictable to the rare: the second phrase is an exact higher repeat of the first, with the exception that the expected falling interval at its end is subtly changed. Small details like this count for a lot.
This song is among the top thirty most performed NC numbers (see Appendix 3). It has, remarkably, achieved this despite a total lack of publications since the contemporaneous sheet-music, and only the original OCR anywhere near its time of origin (ONR 08 doesn't count). ONR 01 is marred by a rather "pop" style from Smith.
OCR 05: Peggy Wood & George Metaxa (Jun 1929)
ONR 08: (in selection) Jack Hylton orch. (Jul 1929)
ONR 02: Adele Leigh & James Pease (1961)
ONR 03: Vanessa Lee & Roberto Cardinali (1962)
ONR 01: Valerie Masterson & Martin Smith (1988)

DEAR LITTLE SOLDIERS

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(1933)
Conversation Piece 1934 (Yvonne Printemps, etc.)
Vocal Score
Quartet for Melanie, Rose, Sophie and Martha as they watch and comment with admiration on a troop of passing soldiery. The music is in a brisk march tempo. The opening notes of the refrain seem to have been pinched from 'Teach Me To Dance Like Grandma'.
OCR 08/NCR 12: Moya Nugent & Maidie Andrews (1934)
ONR 06: Lily Pons, etc. + orch. cond. Engel (1951)

DEAR MADAME SALVADOR
(LETTER SONG)

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(1946)
Pacific 1860 1946 (Graham Payn)
Vocal Score
Romantic aria in flowing 2/2 tempo. Here NC is in flowing post-war operatic mode, in a parlando style and with a characteristic key-shift from Eb to Gb. Towards the conclusion, Kerry sings phrases whose music reappears in the Act I closer as one of Kerry's passages in the verse section of BRIGHT WAS THE DAY, and this song sequence ends with an instrumental Valse on that music.
OCR 13: Graham Payn (1946)

DEAREST LOVE

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(1937)
Operette, 1938
Sep.Publ.
NCSB
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
NCG2
NCR
Romantic slow-waltz aria, sung as the love-song portrayed in the play-within-a-play, The Model Maid, and then taken up as the theme song for the main play.
A long conversational verse section is constructed from satisfyingly integrated musical phrases, the second group of which enjoy a Cowardesque key-change from E to C#. The waltz refrain has melodic grace and breadth, and one tries to ignore the slightly inelegant "parallel" hamonisation of bars 2-3. In truth, it is difficult to suggest a better alternative.
The verse section of this song deserves to be better known. Peggy Wood (OCR10) gets a nice feeling of restlessness from its scale passages. The discreet but lush strings orchestration of the second refrain (Frankel's own? Not used on NCR19) is also noteworthy in this recording.
The song is among the top thirty most popular NC numbers (see Appendix 3).
NCR 19: + H.M.Theatre Orch. cond. Collinson (Feb 1938)
ONR 42: Denny Dennis + Roy Fox Orch. (Mar 12 1938)
NCR 20: Pno acc. by Carroll Gibbons (Mar 24 1938)
OCR 10: Peggy Wood + orch. cond. Frankel (Mar 25 1938)
ONR 24: Anne Ziegler + Harry Acres Orch. (1947)
ONR 43: Victoria Campbell + Mantovani orch. (1947)
NCR 48/ONR 14: (with NC) Joan Sutherland + orch. (1966)
ONR 18: Alison Williams + Piccadilly Dance Orch. (1999)

DEBUTANTES

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(1932)
Words and Music, 1932 (P. Harding, Betty Hare, Moya Nugent)
Vocal Score
Includes: Debutantes No.1 (Music No.2)
"Four Little Debutantes are We"
Debutantes No.2 (Music No.6)
"The Gin is Lasting Out"
Debutantes No.3 (Music No.20)
"Four Little Debutantes, So Tired"
It is probable that the music for this/these was reworked or reintroduced for Set To Music , 1938 (USA) - there is a mystery title known as THREE LITTLE DEBUTANTES in that show, for which the music is not extant. As STM was partly based on and used some of the same music numbers of WAM, it seems likely that there is at least a close musical connection.
A "sophisticated" song in the 'Poor Little Rich Girl' vein, but burdened with lyrics and music with very much more of a disillusioned tone. These numbers caused disagreement between NC and Cochran: "What came in for the most unfavourable comment from audiences was the appearance from time to time of the three debs, 'bright young things' of C's earlier period, now burdened with depression and disillusionment ... but N felt that they were so much a part of the whole pattern that he could not consent to cut them". [CBC]

DEEP IN THE HEART OF TEXAS
See Appendix 1.a

DEMAND NO PITY

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(1953/54)
After The Ball, 1954
Unpubl. MS Vocal Score
Act II of the original pre-London version of After The Ball opened with Lady Windermere's Aria I FEEL SO TERRIBLY ALONE, which was closely followed with the scene in which Mrs Erlynne beseeches Lady W not to betray her husband. The scene then continued with the duet GO, I BEG YOU, GO, followed by some conversation between the two women over music and then a sung duet, which started with Mrs Erlynne singing "Once long ago/A woman innocent as you/Decided to throw/Her happiness away". A further section of music, DEMAND NO PITY, also survives in the Vocal Score manuscripts as a discrete titled number.
It is one of the better-constructed and satisfying pieces of music in the original score, and which had to be cut at the reorganization, on account of Mary Ellis's voice not being up to it. A lyrical aria with a strong melody and with slightly surprising chromatic harmonies, it is a piece well worth getting to know.

DESCRIPTION OF BALLETS
See BALLETS

DEVON

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1. Original version 1920 [NCSL]
2. Rewritten version (1954)
1. in London Calling!, 1923
2. Café de Paris cabaret, 1954
1. music extract only in Pno.Sel. from London Calling! (AH&C)
Lyrics in NCSL
2. Lyrics in BD – MUSIC LOST
No recorded or manuscript copy has yet been found of the 1954 rewritten version. The rewrite was included with IRISH SONG and SPINNING SONG (and possibly also SCOTTISH AIR or JESSIE HOOPER) in a sequence of short parody songs under the general banner of 'These I Have Loathed'. Unfortunately, the 1954 lyrics do not entirely "fit" the 1920 tune as printed.

DIANE DE POITIERS
See MIDNIGHT MATINÉE

DON'T LET FATHER SEE THE FRESCOES
See Appendix 1.b

DON'T LET'S BE BEASTLY TO THE GERMANS

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Spring 1943
NC in broadcasts Aug-Dec 1943
(no show)
Sep.Publ.
NCSB
The song was only just 'No Show', since the number was booked, rehearsed and printed into the programme for the H. M. Tennent revue Flying Colours which opened 26th August 1943; it was to have been performed by Douglas Byng (just right for him), but the song was cut after the dress rehearsal (at the request of Lorn Loraine, NC being overseas) because of a misguided public furore over its lyrics. NC later was careful, in his spoken intros to both NCR26 and NCR30, to make the point that it is a satirical song (as if it were possible that this simple fact could really have escaped peoples' attention).
This song was certainly around by the end of June, when the Diaries first mention writing “a new verse”, and it was promptly in rehearsal and recorded on July 2nd.
A classic NC 6/8-tempo comedy point number with great lyric ingenuity and two "inserted" but integral verse sections. NCR 24 features a very rhythmic accompt. (what the song needs) but with perhaps a shade too much doubling of the tune.
Despite its wartime topicality, this song still gets a surprising amount of radio airplay and manages thereby to find a place among the top thirty most popular NC numbers today (see Appendix 3).
NCR 24: pno. acc. Robb Stewart (1943)
NCR 26: + orch. cond. David Broekman (1944)
NCR 30: + orch. cond. Mantovani (1947)
ONR 22: Edward Earle & The Satisfactions (1968)

DON'T MAKE FUN OF THE FAIR

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(Bermuda?) 1950
The Lyric Revue, 1951(Graham Payn, Dora Bryan, Joan Heal, Ian Carmichael)
& NC in cabaret at Café de Paris 1951
Sep.Publ.
NCSB
NCG2
Satirical, rollicking 6/8-tempo comedy song in honour of the 1951 Festival of Britain. "I do not believe that it has been an incentive to crime and it is too much to hope that it could in any way be a deterrent to bureaucratic idiocy." [NCSB]
Two verses of previously-unknown lyrics surfaced recently in the Estate archives, but since these were partly anti-Labour and anti-aliens, the humour of them may have been considered a little oblique. Hackforth was MD of The Lyric Revue.
NCR 33: pno. acc. Norman Hackforth (1951)

DON'T PUT YOUR DAUGHTER ON THE STAGE
See MRS. WORTHINGTON

DON'T TAKE OUR CHARLIE FOR THE ARMY

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Feb-Mar. 1963, Jamaica [NCD, 10 Mar. 63]
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963 (Tessie O’Shea)
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
NCG2
Pastiche music-hall type song, part of the 'London' sequence of scenes/songs which also included LONDON IS A LITTLE BIT OF ALLRIGHT and WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH A NICE BEEF STEW? The tune construction is a little reminiscent of 'What's Going To Happen To The Tots?', though with less development and far less lyric interest.
NCR 46: acc. unknown (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: Tessie O’Shea, Sean Scully, Ensemble (Dec 1963)

DON'T TURN AWAY FROM LOVE

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(1961)
Sail Away, 1961 (James Hurst)
Sep.Publ.
Ballad in flowing 2/2 tempo. Perhaps not really NC's most memorable melodising. Chromatic scale elemets in the second and third phrases lead to slight problems with comfortable harmonization, and one gets the feeling that this melody really wants to be an altogether more expansive thing than it is. With a bit more development, and a lusher orchestral treatment, this piece could easily be an escapee from the score of After The Ball. As it is, it is merely unremarkable. As an instrumental piece, with that sort of orchestration (ONR 09), it just about works.
OCR 18: James Hurst (1961)
OCR 19: David Holliday (1962)
ONR 09: Ted Straeter orch. (1962)

DON'TS FOR MY DARLINGS
See Appendix 1.c

DOWN WITH THE WHOLE DAMN (DARN) LOT
See Appendix 1.a

DREAM GIRL
See Appendix 1.a

DREAM IS OVER, THE

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Possibly intended for This Year of Grace (1928)
film: The Little Damozel, 1933 (Anna Neagle)
Sep.Publ. (copyright 1928)
NCG2
NCR
A lyric dating from the 1920's entitled 'YOU'VE GONE AWAY' [see BD] is the forerunner of this song, which shares two complete Verse lyrics, and matching rhythmic lines at the start of the refrain. Despite very "bitty" phrase-lengths - never longer than ten syllables and often as few as four - both verse and refrain sections of the song hold together well, with an overall feeling of tautness and economy. Carroll Gibbons in NCR 03 catches this feeling nicely, with an accompaniment also notable for its economy. The construct is unusual in that the Refrain's main tune is only four bars long while the "middle 8" remains as an eight-bar section; so we get A4+4, +B8, A4+4 instead of the much more usual A8,A8,B8, A8.
The song seems to have achieved the distinction of being separately published in 1928 despite no exposure beyond NCR 03. Perhaps NC himself pushed it forward with his publishers on the strength of the recording.
NCR 03: pno.acc. Carroll Gibbons (1928)
ONR 44: Anna Neagle (1933)
ONR 23: Ian Bostridge acc. Jeffrey Tate (2002)

DREAM YOUR DREAM AGAIN
See Appendix 1.b

DREAMS
See Appendix 1.c

DRINKING SONG
(HARRIET MARRIET A SOLDIER)

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1935
Family Album (Tonight at 8.30) 1936 (NC, G.Lawrence &c.)
Vocal Score
The work has four thematically or lyrically discrete sections:
'Here's a Toast to Each of Us...
'Harriet Married a Soldier'
'Emily Married a Doctor'
'You, Love, For Ever a Part of Me' (Jasper and Jane)
The music for the 'Harriet' and 'Emily' sections is similar, and Jasper's first section ('Here's a Toast') is reprised later by all together. The most musically interesting and satisfying section is the 'You, Love...' duet for Jasper and Jane, which makes a feature of intervals of a descending seventh. A neglected romantic treasure.
OCR 09/NCR 15 & 16: (1936)

DUKE OF YORK'S
(BREAKING IT GENTLY)

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(1923)
London Calling!, 1923 (opening chorus)
Programmes of London Calling! - where the number is titled BREAKING IT GENTLY. The lyric, which presents an apology to the audience for the audacity of staging a leggy revue at such an august establishment, is a recent rediscovery [BD].
The music however is lost - except for an extract of GINGER UP (in the published 'Piano Selection' arranged by Braham), which seems to be the finale section of DUKE OF YORK'S. (BD also found a lyric variant of part of GINGER UP which he called BUBBLES.)
The start and end of the lyric is a good "match" to the printed melody - a snappy theme in dotted quavers - but there remain seven lines of lyrics in the middle which are superfluous to the printed music extract.
Gertrude Lawrence remembered that "the opening scene was a straight comedy drawing-room scene. The actors gradually went into music as the stage filled up, and the whole scene developed into a vast opening chorus." [GL]