C - Titles

C

CABALLERO

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Originally intended for inclusion in On With the Dance (1925)
This Year of Grace, 1928. (Adrienne Brune)
Sep.Publ.
Revue song in Habanera style.  The number originally included "solos and dances", but  (in 1928) it became subject  to a pruning exercise pre-London and suffered loss of these and became SPANISH FANTASY [a sketch apparently without music] by the London opening.  Later on, the 'solos and dancers' were restored together with the song, but the replacement title remained in place.  Another cut was JEWELS AND PERFUMES (qv).  
OCR 04: (in medley) Orch. cond. Ernest Irving (1928)
NCR 11/ONR 35: (instr., in medley) Reisman orch. (1933)

CABARET MEDLEY
Arr. Accomp. Norman Hackforth

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1951[NH]
Café de Paris Cabaret, 1951
Unpubl. MS (Hackforth Estate)
In its uncut version it included:
(Key)
(C) I'll See You Again (opening 16 bars of refrain)
(C) Dance Little Lady (whole refrain) (high C on last word 'behind' becomes first note of:)
(F) Poor Little Rich Girl ('The life you lead...' to end) 
(F) A Room With A View ('We'll be as happy...'  to end)
(D) *Parisian Pierrot (middle of refrain to end)
(Db) *Any Little Fish (one complete refrain)
(Gb) *You Were There (one complete refrain)
(D) Someday I'll Find You (refrain, first 16 bars)
(D) Let's Say Goodbye (refrain middle to end)
(F) I'll Follow My Secret Heart (complete short refrain)
(Db) If Love Were All (from "For I believe..."  to end)
(Ab) Play, Orchestra, Play! (one complete refrain)
[*items not included on NCR 41]
                                   
This medley was well-used by NC in live performances, and was the basis behind Peter Matz's reorchestrated and slimmed-down version performed and recorded at Las Vegas (NCR 38). During their wartime concert tours in 1944, Norman Hackforth assembled a piano medley of Coward tunes, known to themselves as “scrambled father”, which he would play as an interlude when NC found it necessary to withdraw offstage for refreshment.  Doubtless there are musical details of the Medley which must have first emerged in ‘Scrambled Father’.
There are some interesting points of harmonic detail, not least the firm re-harmonisation of the cadence at bars 7-8 of ‘Someday I’ll Find You’, and the re-chording of the final two phrases of ‘You Were There’ (avoiding a completely idiosyncratic and much less comfortable original). [See entry for those titles for further info, and DV.]  
Apart from the cuts noted above, the most interesting difference between NCR 34 and NCR 41 (below) is that the latter enjoys post-Las Vegas orchestrations with the pre-Las Vegas accompanist.   NC remembered that the 1958 Night of a Hundred Stars was "brilliantly organised ... I came on at the end and received the greatest ovation of my career.  It was really staggering and most moving.  Also, thank God, I was good.  I did my old medley, 'Tots' and four new refrains of 'Let's Do It', which really pulled the place down.  It was deeply gratifying and I shall never forget the warmth of that audience." [NCD, 27 Jul 58]. I believe that this was also the last occasion at which Norman Hackforth played for Coward. NCR 34: C de P Orch./pno.acc. Norman Hackforth (1951)
NCR 41: +orch./acc. N. Hackforth (Night of 100 Stars, 1958)

CAFE DE LA PAIX
See COSMOPOLITAN LADY

CALL OF LIFE, THE

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(1928-29)
1929, Bitter Sweet  (Act 1 Sc.1) (Peggy Wood)
Vocal Score
A long introduction in which Lady Shayne (Sari) berates the "bright young things" of the 1920's for their discordancy and lack of love-ideals leads to a broad romantic refrain in 2/2 tempo where she extols the merits of answering the big romantic pull.  The introductory verse consists of a colla voce waltz (Lady Shayne) which features NC's characteristic abrupt key-shifting, a section in which the chorus start to Charleston and sing the blues, a section of exchanges between Sari and the chorus whose melodic shape reappears in the verse section of SOMETHING TO DO WITH SPRING three years later, and a reprise of the key-shifting colla voce.  
And the refrain itself is a big romantic pull, strongly coherent between its two halves by all the phrases sharing the same melodic/rhythmic structure with three upbeats.  The principal melody of the refrain - only its third phrase - derives its power from simple repetition of the same broadened phrase. 
The music is reprised at the close of the Act 1 Finale as Sarah and Carl's big exit number as they elope.
This is maybe the first indication in NC's musical output that he was capable of producing coherent "big romantic stuff" (as opposed to more terse revue-style writing). 
ONR 04 excises the chorus introduction, and has very clear words and good pacing made uncomfortable on account of flatness of pitch.  ONR 01 is the only one to feature the complete chorus parts of the number and to include its reprise at the end of Act 1 Finale, and Masterson is generally fine.   
NCR 11: (in medley) + Leo Reisman orch. (1933)
ONR 03: Vanessa Lee + Michael Collins Orch. (1962)
ONR 04: June Bronhill + Johnny Douglas Orch. (1969)
ONR 01: Masterson + New Sadler's Wells Opera (1988)

CARPATHIAN NATIONAL ANTHEM
See YASNI KOZKOLAI

CARRIE

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(1923)
London Calling!, 1923 (Gertrude Lawrence) Charlot's Revue of 1926
Sep.Publ. Keith Prowse (EMI) 1923
Music-hall type revue-song.  One imagines this song to have been quite "daring" - for 1923.
Possibly the very first example of an NC song about a naughty female who preserves the veneer while all sorts of double-entendres suggest a shameless reality.  There are more lyrics than feature in the OCR 01 recording, and they're all good.  The verse 2 refrain lyric also features the first appearance in NC’s song characters of an 'Auntie Jessie'. 
OCR 01: Gertrude Lawrence (1925)
ONR 16a: Courtney Kenney (2001)

CAVALCADE

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Most of the music in the 1931 musical was written by others of an earlier era; but see also TWENTIETH CENTURY BLUES and LOVER OF MY DREAMS for NC's original compositions. Also:
NCR 07: (vocal selections Pt.1) Ray Noble orch. (1931)
NCR 09: (vocal selections Pt.2) Ray Noble orch. (1932)

CHAMPAGNE
See Appendix 1.a

CHANGING OF THE GUARD
See ALLA MARCIA 2

CHANSON
See FRENCH SONG

CHARMING, CHARMING

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(1933)
Conversation Piece, 1934 (Act I No.4) (Yvonne Printemps, Maidie Andrews, Heather Thatcher, Moya Nugent)
publ. Vocal Score
Chorus point number.  The music leads into another section  which although a continuation of 'Charming, Charming', is significantly different from the preceeding passage, and sufficiently long, for it to warrant a title in its own right - see DANSER, DANSER.
The point of this scene is Melanie admiring her new frocks while her companions pass comments.
ONR 08: (included in 'Regency Rakes') (20 Feb 1934)
OCR 08: Yvonne Printemps & Heather Thatcher (26 Feb 1934)
ONR 06: Lily Pons etc. + orch. cond. Engel (1951)
ONR 14: Joan Sutherland + orch (1966)

CHASE ME CHARLIE

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1949
Ace of Clubs 1950 (Pat Kirkwood)
Sep.publ
NCSB
STA
NCG1
NCR
Fast waltz cabaret song - part of the "club floorshow" for AoC sung by Pinkie and the Ace girls. While maybe not a direct pastiche, this song could easily be mistaken for something slightly louche from the music-hall era.  Both verse and refrain sections benefit from a strong, inventive melody with repeated phrases and nicely suggestive melodic swoops and curves.  Also a great lyric. It is said to be one of Cleo Laine's favourite songs, but there is (?sadly) no ONR of her singing it. 
OCR 14: Pat Kirkwood + orch (1950)
ONR 30a: June Bronhill + orch. (1981)
ONR 36: Mel Tormé + George Shearing Trio (1983)
ONR 25: Pat Kirkwood acc. Matthew Freeman (1994)
ONR 28: Barbara Lea acc. Keith Ingham (1999)

CHAUVE-SOURIS
Sometimes known by its first lyrics, "ISH CON BROSHKA..."

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(1927)
This Year of Grace, 1928
publ.Vocal Score
A parody of the then-modish Diaghilev ballet of the same name. The peculiar words are due to the fact that this number is prefaced [in NCSL] with a "speech before curtain" in which a Russian begs apologies for his poor English, and explains that the scene is "a peecneeck een olt Russia. The caviare iss all eaten up and the samovar dry and the peasants play peculiar games weeth one another and seeng and seeng and seeng".

CHILDREN OF THE RITZ

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(1932)
Words and Music, 1932 (Joyce Barbour and Company)
publ.Vocal Score
& in Pno Sel.
Chorus point number. The song is a lament for the lost glories and (since the "crash" of 1929) monies of the 1920's young wealthy, and is in part a lyric reworking of the earlier [1925?] "What's Going to Happen to the Children?" - 'Now shops we partonised are serving us with writs / What's going to happen to the Children of the Ritz?'.
ONR 08: (in medley) Ray Noble Orch. (1932)
ONR 37: Joyce Grenfell + Mantovani orch. (1947)

CHINESE CYCLE
See Appendix 1.c

CHOIR BOYS' SONG
See Appendix 1.e under FETE GALANTE

CHORAL FINALE
See LONG LIVE THE PRESS

CHURCH PARADE
See Appendix 1.a

CINDERELLA SONG
See Appendix 1.a

CITY

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1930 [NCSL]
Cochran's 1931 Revue (Bernardi)
Sep. Publ.
A revue song on the same theme as 'World Weary', but rather less elegantly-crafted.
There is something to be gleaned from the fact that this song was separately published, when it cannot ever have been a popular number, and one suspects NC prodding in the background. Though not a contender for the "great song" label, it is maybe a deeply personally revealing one, showing in its lyric an almost pathological city-weariness, and in its melodic phrases a high and at times wailing chromaticism.  This could well be the song of someone on the edge of a nervous breakdown – and we know this is autobiographical to NC.  All too easily one can imagine NC himself attempting it, at the very top of his vocal range, and the moment you do, you'll realise that he meant every word of it.
I have only ever once heard this song performed - in a Wigmore Hall, London 'Songmaker's Almanak' concert, in the early-80s, accompanied (rather too literally) from the printed sheet-music by Graham Johnson.  It was surprisingly effective.

CLEAR, BRIGHT MORNING

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(1953)
After the Ball  1954 (Vanessa Lee)
Unpubl. MS (probably Philip Martell's)
Romantic Aria.  Another item in this score which ambles around, somewhat lacking any sense of direction. The song was not in the original touring production (which was more or less reorganised after NC had seen it in Liverpool) and was added only in the pre-London version of the show.  The original working title was 'Now In The Clear Bright Morning' (the opening words of the song as known),  but  there is also a lyric sheet in the archives which shows two four-line stanzas which do not figure or fit in the 'Clear Bright Morning' music MS. They probably form a dropped verse section to what survives in music MS.  The effect of the number is maximised by Vanessa Lee in OCR 16
OCR 16: Vanessa Lee (1954)
ONR 00: Kristin Huxhold acc. Mark Hartman (2005)

CLEO
See MIDNIGHT MATINEE

CLERGYMAN WHO'S NEVER BEEN TO LONDON, THE

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(1932)
Words and Music, 1932
Vocal Score
Part of THE HALL OF FAME (qv)
I still know, in 2003 in rural Norfolk, UK, a person in the village "who's never been to London, And hasn't got the least desire to go".   A 16-bar comedy vignette of the sort that must have taken NC no time at all to write, once the sketch was fixed.
ONR 22 (under HALL OF FAME): (Arthur Siegel, 1990)

CO-COMMUNISTS, THE
See Appendix 1.a

CO-OCTOGENERIANS
See Appendix 1.b

COCKTAIL CHORUS
See Appendix 1.c

COCONUT GIRL, THE

There is a sequence of songs, often together called 'The Coconut Girl', from the "show within a show"  of The Girl Who Came To Supper.  Confusingly, one of these songs is the "title song from the show"  also called 'The Coconut Girl'.
The recording and publication details of the separate songs may be found under their individual titles:



1. Welcome to Pootzie van Doyle
2. (The) Coconut Girl (notes below)
3. Paddy Macneil and his Automobile
4. Swing Song
5. (We're) Six Lillies of the Valley
6. (The) Walla Walla Boola
7. Time Will Tell
8. Play the Game

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(1962)
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963
Unpubl. MS
A pastiche of a theme-song from a 1911 American musical play. NC was always strong on pastiche, and rejoiced in the invitation to do the score and lyrics for TG: "It is 'period' and a perfect period, what's more, for my music and lyrics." [NCD,15 April '62]  The 'demo tape' NCR 46 follows shortly after this diary entry, so the inspiration flowed fast.
NCR 46: Acc. unknown (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: Florence Henderson, Sean Scully (Dec 1963)

COME A LITTLE CLOSER
See Appendix 1.a

COME BACK TO THE ISLAND

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(1946)
Pacific 1860 , 1946 (Graham Payn+ chorus)
Vocal Score
Romantic Ballad. Act II closing chorus.
Sweeping romanticism and some lush harmonisation, with a whiff of the Hawaiian about it.   Coward uses little harmonic figurations in this piece (and throughout this score) which are still in evidence in pieces written for the very differently-feeling score of Ace Of Clubs four years later.

COME BE MY TRUE LOVE
Also THIS TIME IT'S TRUE LOVE (same music)

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by November 1962
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963 (Jose Ferrer and Florence Henderson)
Sep.publ. (USA) under title  THIS TIME IT'S TRUE LOVE
Romantic Ballad. This may have been the "lovely ballad with no lyrics as yet" NC wrote around 16 July 1962, and it certainly had lyrics and a title by November 11 [NCD].  Before the show reached New York the number had been a duet for Mary and the Regent.  Somewhere after Boston it was changed to being a pair of solos, and each separately sung, which accounts for the change of title.  However, a batch of material was ordered for publishing before New York, so as to be ready to sell during the tour, e.g. in Philadelphia.
This is a fine enough duet love-ballad melody, but somehow one has the feeling that NC's heart is not really in it.  " 'A', it's a question of being sincere", and perhaps the lyrics lack sincerity?
Musicologists will be fascinated to note that the first five notes of the opening phrase of the refrain are identical to those for A ROOM WITH A VIEW.  
NCR 46: Acc. unknown ('Come Be...') (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: Ferrer & Henderson ('This Time...')(Dec 1963)

COME THE WILD, WILD WEATHER

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(may be a good deal earlier than 1960)
Waiting in the Wings, 1960 (Graham Payn)
Sep.publ. WW folio (1962)
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
NCG2
A refrain-only ballad. A effectively wistful and surprisingly simple melody-line matched to a straightforward folksong-type lyric, but with space for one of NC's hallmark keychanges, into the "middle 8" passage, from Db into F, which has the effect of brightening the song at this point.  
Graham Payn remembered that the song "hadn't been written for the show" [GP] but that it was a pre-existing piece pulled out of the drawer as the occasion fitted its use.
ONR 20: Particia Hodge acc. William Blezard (1986)
ONR 38: Jerry Hadley + orch. (1992)
ONR 25: David Kernan acc. Carr & Bateman (1994)
ONR 28: Barbara Lea acc. Keith Ingham (1999)
ONR 13: Dominic Alldis + combo (2000)

COME TO ME

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(1961)
Sail Away, 1961 (Elaine Stritch)
Unpubl. MS
(Mimi's entrance, Act I)  A strong comedy character song, whose  refrain opening melody owes a lot to the rhumba-ish influence of 'Wait a Bit, Joe'. 
NCR 43: acc. Werner? (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Elaine Strich (Oct 1961)
OCR 19: Elaine Stritch (1962)

COMMISSIONING
See IN WHICH WE SERVE

COMPOSER THEME

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(1953-ish?)
unused
Norman Hackforth's MS (Estate archives)
A twenty-eight bar piece with "repeated refrain", written out for piano. There are no indications of possible use or intention.  A broad, sweeping melody is set above sustained harmonies, which change "sideways", e.g. from Ab ma straight into C ma. The piece shares the same harmonic/melodic idiom as much of the score of After The Ball, and one presumes was composed at the same period.

CONVERSATION PIECE VALSE (medley)
See Appendix 2.b

CORNER OF THE STREET, THE

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(1945?)
Intended for use in the abortive Hoi Polloi (1949)
Unpubl. MS
Point number.  The lyric (celebrating post-war damage) now renders the song dated.  While it is a well worked-out song, it goes a bit haywire at the end displaying unsatisfactory phrase lengths and resolutions.  A Norman Hackforth MS replaced a very scrappy earlier one by Robb Stewart.  It's possible this means that the song was dusted off for the Café de Paris cabarets but again not used.

CORONATION CHORALE

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(1962)
The Girl Who Came to Supper, 1963 (Florence Henderson and José Ferrer)
Unpubl. MS
Includes the song (IT'S ALL SO) WONDERFUL (Mary's interlude) (qv)
An elegantly-crafted Chorus number whose tempo and rhythms neatly echo the formal restraint of the characters' setting (royalty attending the 1911 Coronation).  The lyrics are wonderful, and the harmonies very boldly precise within a very terse phrase-structure.  However, It is a song very much tied to its context and offers little scope for general performance.  There are distinct overtones of the 'Ascot Gavotte' number from My Fair Lady (Lerner & Lowe).
NCR 46:  Acc. unknown (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: Ferrer, Henderson & chorus (Dec 1963)

CORSETS
See Appendix 1.a

COSMOPOLITAN LADY

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(1925)
On With the Dance, 1925 (Alice Delysia)
(last item of scene 'Café de la Paix' which opened Act I)
Lyric printed in NCSL. The music, in an extract only, was published in a contemporary Asherberg, Hopwood & Crew (music publishers) house magazine, but not apparently otherwise published.  No archive copy exists.
The scene also includes 'Violet Seller's Song' - See Appendix 1.b
ONR 39: Mantovani orch. (1947)

COULD YOU PLEASE OBLIGE US WITH A BREN GUN?

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July 1941 (London)
13 July 41: NC acc. Hackforth, Hammersmith Palais de Dance, thereafter in troop concerts etc.
sep.publ. 1941
NCSB
Vocal Score Cowardy Custard (in medley)
Comedy Song, lampooning the “Home Guard” and general wartime muddle.  Like ‘I Wonder What Happened To Him’ of three years later, the lyric is a wonderful mix of derision and respect, and the melody sets it to a jaunty 6/8.
Unpublished entries in the Noel Coward Diaries refer in some detail to the little spurt of wartime song composition that occurred at this time [‘London Pride’, ‘Bren Gun’, ‘There Have Been Songs in England’ and ‘Duchess’].  This one started life on June 26: “Spent morning thinking out Home Guard song with Lorn – think it might be funny if the tune turns out well”.  On July 6th “Norman Hackforth arrived. Taught him ‘Bren Gun’ then we went to Winnie’s and typed it.” The following day it was dictated to an amanuensis at Chappells.
NC sent the song to Michael Redgrave to perform that summer (1941) in Plymouth, but had to send a telegram changing the lyric from 'Colonel McNamara' to 'Colonel Montmorency' when it was discovered that there was a real and very angry Colonel McNamara at the War Office (who had been in Calcutta in '92).
As with ‘Don’t Let’s Be Beastly To The Germans’ of the same year, there were those (obviously with no sense of humour at all) who condemned the piece for lacking a sense of National Respect.   
NCR 23: Orch. cond. & pno. acc. Carroll Gibbons (1941)
ONR 30: Peter Greenwell (1995)

COULDN'T WE KEEP ON DANCING?
See Appendix 1.a

COUNTESS MITZI

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(1937)
Operette, 1938 (Fritzi Massary)
Sep.Publ.
Vocal Score
Point number about the polyglot origins of the character Countess Mitzi.  (see also the verse section of the early 60’s song ‘Home’, which has a similar function.) The introductory verse section of this song was later reused in MY FAMILY TREE (TG, 1963).
It is almost a music-hall song, with one of those start-slow-and gradually-get-faster-and-faster refrains, listing the Countess's innumerable names.  Not a bad song, but not hugely memorable.  
OCR 10: Fritzi Massary & Chorus (1938)
ONR 14: JoanSutherland+ orch (1966)

CREME DE LA CREME

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(1953)
After the Ball, 1954
Upubl. MS
Act II opening - Chorus number.  (Middle of Act I in orig.)
Rather a good lyric comedy number, extolling the virtues and the privileged position of the upper echelons of society. A fast waltz chorus in the same sort of mood as REGENCY RAKES, it features a counter-melody for sopranos in the latter parts of the song. It is slightly and pleasantly syncopated, but does not have much sense of melodic direction.
OCR 15: Chorus (1954)

CRISSA
See Appendix 1.c

CROSS YOUR HEART
See Appendix 1.c

CURT, CLEAR AND CONCISE

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(1962/63)
The Girl Who Came To Supper, 1963 (J. Ferrer and R. Cook)
Unpubl. MS
Character song for the Prince Regent, expounding his philanderer's philosophy to his ADC, Northbrook.  A fast waltz much in the manner of JOSEPHINE (1950), but with greater rhythmic variety and (frankly) rather more melodic interest.  The 'middle 8' changes style to passages of fast descending quavers which demand a parlando treatment. .  Its perhaps-not-very-PC lyrics, and a conversational section between the Regent and Northbrook, hinder a wide exposure in cabaret, which is where it really ought to be, because it is a superb match of strong melody with incisive and witty lyrics.  I have always felt it a great shame that Keith Michell never recorded this - he was excellent as the Regent in a 1981 BBC Radio production.
NCR 46: Acc. unknown (Apr 1963)
OCR 20: José Ferrer, Roderick Cook (Dec 1963)

CUSTOMER'S ALWAYS RIGHT (THE)
Second lyric version of THE PASSENGER'S ALWAYS RIGHT (qv)

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Sail Away, 1963 (Charles Braswell)
This chorus number for Arab street vendors opened the second act, and is a 6/8 tempo romp which features some now rather politico-socially incorrect lyrics.
That just makes me love it the more.
NCR 43: Acc. Werner? (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Charles Braswell & chorus (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./ pno.acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: John Hewer & chorus (1962)

CYCLING HOME
See Appendix 1.c