A & B - Titles

 

A

 

AFTER DINNER MUSIC

Sketch from Charlot's 1924 Revue and Charlot's Revue of 1926  (New York) containing three songs (see separate entries for further details of these titles):

1. A LITTLE SLUT  OF  SIX   
2. THE ROSES HAVE MADE ME REMEMBER
3. THE GIRL I AM LEAVING IN ENGLAND TODAY


ALAS THE TIME IS PAST

ORIGIN: (Nov./Dec)1928 (while in NY?)

USE: Bitter Sweet  1929 (Act III opening sequence, ladies chorus)

SOURCE: Vocal Score (music No.22)

NOTES: Concerted number for Sextet (characters Victoria, Harriet, Effie, Gloria, Jane and Honor - all ladies' voices), whose precise voicing of harmonies may well owe something to the arrangement skills of Elsie April.  It is a relaxed, quietly-ending number on the theme (a favourite one of Coward's) of regret for the lost innocence and manners of the past - "things were simpler then".  The sextet in ONR 01 is a bit distant, but they give a good, simple madrigalic account, which is what the piece needs.

DISCOGRAPHY: ONR 01: New Sadler's Wells Opera 1988


ALICE IS AT IT AGAIN

ORIGIN: (May-June 1946, 'White Cliffs', Kent). Cut in rehearsal from Pacific 1860, 1946

USE: Cabaret performances, 1951-55

SOURCE: Sep. publ. 1955, SA2 STA Vocal Score Cowardy Custard NCG2

NOTES: Cabaret Song/Point Number. Its original title was 'Sweet Alice'.  It was composed along with most of the music for P 1860. However, Mary Martin refused to sing it. NC later rewrote the lyrics of the last verse to make them more “modern” as opposed to the original “period” lyrics for P 1860,  and inserted it into his Cabaret performances.  It became well-known as a result of the Las Vegas cabaret recording and was published that year. It's an unusual comedy number in that it does not have the "normal" rumpty-tumpty firm rhythmic setting. The two verses and first refrain, despite more than tolerably suggestive lyrics, are set mainly to a rather wistful and gentle melodic line largely in flowing 6/8 rhythm. Only when the second refrain is reached is there any  steady rhythmic impetus, and  the song 'takes off' with a new, snappy melody after its first phrase, and builds to a firm ending restating the title. NC demonstrates in NCR 37 how he envisaged the first section as needing to be taken in relaxed two-bar phrases. The NCR 37 orchestration was clearly Matz’s model for NCR 38.

DISCOGRAPHY:

NCR 37:  + Wally Stott Orch., acc.Hackforth (1954)
NCR 38: + C. Hayes orch./acc. Peter Matz (1955)
ONR 07:Tudor Davis/Una Stubbs (Cowardy Custard, 1972)
ONR 16a: Courtney Kenny (2001)


ALL MY LIFE AGO

ORIGIN: 1946 (White Cliffs, Kent)

USE: Orig. intended for Pacific 1860, but unused.  Then in score of After The Ball 1954 (Mary Ellis)

SOURCE: MS Vocal Score for After the Ball (Hackforth’s)& Robb Stewart's  MS + lyric specifying number for 'Rosa'

NOTES: Romantic Ballad A good deal of the lyrics were changed for the song’s use in After The Ball  and the original intro. was dropped.

A 16-bar Verse leads into Refrain 'cantando e molto legato' - a gently reminiscent number sung by Mrs Erlynne to Lady Windermere on the theme of 'may you be happier than I - go your own way, but please remember me'.

It's probable that what survives is a cut down version of a longer original. What survives is also lush but rather formless.  One is almost tempted to say that it is mercifully short.  Mary Ellis on OCR 15 is really rather execrable – her tuning gets worse as the number progresses and she ends the piece nearly a semitone flat. Fortunately (for it has grace and poise) there is now a new and less execrable recording of this song, on ONR 00 - where for some reason it is listed under the title 'Remember Me'

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 15
: Mary Ellis (1954)
ONR 00: Mary Illes acc. Mark Hartman (2005)


ALL THE FUN OF THE FARM  (FUN ON THE FARM) (Orig. working title was simply 'FARM')

ORIGIN: (1922)

USE: Cavalcade,1931: Act I Scene 4 (part of 'Mirabelle' sequence)

SOURCE: Unpubl. MS, which is written out in the same hand as that for WHEN WE WERE GIRLS TOGETHER (London Calling! 3rd Edn. 1924), SIX and TEMPERAMENTAL HONEYMOON. This unknown hand is assumed to be pre-Elsie April.  The MS has the lyric added by  a later hand.

NOTES: Point Number - a pastiche of a 1900-style musical comedy number with a very silly lyric.  The song, rhythmically a bouncy 6/8, is directed to be "nice and bright", and starts sensibly enough with a girl expressing her delight at being able to leave a cosmopolitan world of travel and settle for a deeply rural life, but degenerates towards the end into a cacophony of animal noises. cf. DEVON. 


ALL THINGS BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL
See Appendix 1.b


ALLA MARCIA 1 (POLKA ALLA MARCIA) (SENTRIES' DUET)

ORIGIN: Sept/Oct 1958 (Bermuda) [NCD]

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No.2

NOTES: A sprightly little march in Eb.  The music is based on 'The British Grenadiers'.

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLA MARCIA 2 (THE CHANGING OF THE GUARD)

ORIGIN: Early Dec. 1958, NY [NCD]

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No.13

NOTES: A strong, extended march in 6/8 time, reminiscent of 'A Life On The Ocean Wave'.  There are two good melodies.

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLEGRETTO (AMERICAN GIRL)

ORIGIN: Sept/Oct 1958 (Bermuda)

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No. 8 origin ascription NCD 5.10.57  - if indeed this piece is the "light waltz" that NC refers to here.  It is only fourteen bars long and doesn't seem substantial enough to be worth remarking upon.

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLEGRO 1 (SCHOOLGIRLS AND NUNS)

ORIGIN: (late1958)

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No. 11

NOTES: The middle section of this strong vivace in 4/4 shows NC experimenting with the melody pitched below the accompanying harmonies and figurations.

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLEGRO 2 (THE BATHCHAIR)

ORIGIN: (late 1958)

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. Pno. score No.14

NOTES: One might expect a number featuring an elderly person in a bathchair to be sedate, but it isn't.  A strong and extended allegro in 2/2 tempo, it features passages of helter-skelter quavers.

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLEGRO VIVACE 1 (SAILOR)

ORIGIN: (Late 1958)

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No. 9

NOTES: A little hornpipe leads to a passage in elegant rising-and-falling two-bar phrases, which has some thematic links to the PAS DE DEUX No. 1 which follows  

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17
: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALLEGRO VIVACE 2 (JUVENILE DELINQUENTS)

ORIGIN: (Late 1958)

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No. 17

NOTES: This is substantially the same music, in different keys, as ALLEGRO 1 (see above).

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ALWAYS BE NICE TO FATHER see Appendix 1.c


ALWAYS BE NICE TO THE GENTLEMEN

ORIGIN: (1943)

USE: Unused

SOURCE: A music only MS in the Mander and Mitchenson Collection in the hand of Robb Stewart. For him, it is remarkably clear and well laid-out, and as his MSS deteriorated markedly in clarity after 1945 to something bordering on the chaotic by 1950, one guesses that this was among the earliest transcriptions he made for NC. 

NOTES: Point Number for a mother-and-daughter, well worked-out with two long verse sections and three long refrains, and not entirely dissimilar in mood to MOTHER AND DAUGHTER which cropped up in Sigh No More in 1945. Details gleaned from unpublished bits of the Noel Coward Diaries show that this song was “finished” on October 31 1943, and that NC thought that “it is good, but [I’m] not quite satisfied with the last line.”
NC  thought  enough of it to include it in the 'miscellaneous' 1940's section of NCL in 1965, despite its non-use. The arrangement of the refrain melody notes is faintly reminiscent of those for HIS EXCELLENCY REGRETS, though the pieces are rhythmically quite different.


AMERICAN GIRL See ALLEGRETTO


ANDANTE (RAIN MUSIC)

ORIGIN: Early Dec. 1958, NY [NCD]

USE: London Morning  (Ballet) 1959

SOURCE: Publ. pno. score No. 18

NOTES: Shimmering tremolandos illustrate the rain, over a rather good, sweeping melody in legato phrases. It is the penultimate number of the ballet, and leads into the FINALE.    

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 17: LPO Cond. Corbett (1959)
ONR 11: Prague Phil. Cond. Robin White (1995)


ANDANTINO See BALLET (THE LEGEND OF THE LILY)


ANNA THE AUCTIONEER  See Appendix 1.b


ANNOUNCEMENT

ORIGIN: (1932)

USE: Words and Music, 1932 (various incl.chorus)      

SOURCE: WAM Vocal Score      

NOTES: Same introductory music for BALLETS (Music No.15, Act II), THE HALL OF FAME (Music No.8, Act I) and JOURNEY'S END (Music No.10, first-half closer). This is a chorus girls' sung introduction to what follows, addressed direct to the audience.  The words are different and the music is in a new key each time. See also OPENING CHORUS, which establishes the 'Chorus-direct-to-Audience' style of the show generally.

DISCOGRAPHY: see ONR 22 under HALL OF FAME   


ANY LITTLE FISH

ORIGIN: Christmas 1930 (Goldenhurst)

USE: Cochran's 1931 Revue (Ada-May); The Third Little Show  (USA) - on tour only

SOURCE: Sep.publ., NCSB, Vocal Score of Cowardy Custard

NOTES: This is a mature revue-type point number, where Coward is really at the peak of his 20's comedy dance-song powers. Good interior rhyming, and nicely general so it doesn't date easily. Interesting to note that NC might have lifted his title line from Gershwin's CAN'T HELP LOVIN' DAT MAN which includes the lyric 'Fish got to swim and birds got to fly', and which was a UK popular success in mid-1928. 

DISCOGRAPHY:
NCR 06: +Orch./acc. Ray Noble (1931)
NCR 09: (in medley) +orch. cond. Ray Noble (1932)
NCR: 32 (in medley) pno.acc. Norman Hackforth (1951)
ONR 07: Anna Sharkey & P. Gale (Cowardy Custard, 1972)
ONR 09a: Michael Law (2002)


AS LONG AS YOU LOVE ME A LITTLE see Appendix 1.c


ASTONISHED HEART, THE

ORIGIN: 1950

USE: Music for film suite

SOURCE: Publ. 1950, in four parts, for piano solo.  Also an archive MS copy which shows considerably more complexity and length than the published version. [A rather similar situation exists with the MS archives for In Which We Serve (q.v.)] There's also a MS 'Theme for Piano' in ink, same on reverse in pencil with violin obb. part above, all in Robb Stewart's hand. Also RS MS of opening passage of second section which is more or less the draft for the printed version, but with thicker texture, "tidied up" a bit and very slightly expanded. The RS MSS includes another version showing a vocal or instumental line separately.

NOTES: The music still earns respectable amounts in broadcasts royalties (see Appendix 3 for details).


B

(RETURN TO TOP)

BABY'S BOTTLE (TIME FOR BABY'S BOTTLE)

ORIGIN: (1950)

USE: Ace of Clubs, 1950 

SOURCE: Unpubl. Stewart's MS copy is one of his scrappiest, and it was later redone by Norman Hackforth.

NOTES: Point Number, actually about perfume. It was one of the "floorshow" numbers performed by Felix and the Ace girls. There are two refrains in a fast, syncopated 2/2 tempo.


BACK TO NATURE

ORIGIN: (1923?)

SOURCE: CPA2  (1939)

NOTES: Trio for men’s voices, originally written for The Co-Optimists, perhaps as early as 1923, but there's no evidence of their performing it.  It was later considered for inclusion in This Year of Grace (1928).

NC himself clearly held the song in high regard, judging from the fact that it was put forward for publication in CPA at least ten years after its composition.

It is a well-developed comedy chorus song that could relatively easily have its lyrics tweaked to make it suitable for performance as a solo.  It is the comic 6/8 tempo upbeat version of songs like ‘World Weary’ and ‘City’, displaying a more deliberate rebellion against notions of societal decorum and a yearning for the personal freedom of life ‘back to nature’.  

There are three verses of 16-bar Verse followed by 32-bar Refrain, all densely-lyric-ed.  The harmonies are a little static (it stays pretty close to the home key Bb) but with a moment of unusual resolution at the end of the second phrase of the Refrain.  

If the song was written as early as 1923, it is remarkable, for it has all the characteristics of the more mature 6/8 comedy numbers of the 30’s such as ‘Mrs Worthington’ or ‘Marvellous Party (albeit with less harmonic interest and movement).  It’s not bad even for 1928, come to that.


BALLET (THE LEGEND OF THE LILY)

ORIGIN: (1927)

USE: This Year of Grace, 1928

SOURCE: Vocal Score, Music No.13 (Act II) Music only - no lyrics.

NOTES: It is clear from the "Introductory Speech" prefacing the "Dress Plot" for this printed in NCSL that both this and CHAUVE SOURIS (q.v.) are take-offs of the then recently revolutionary performances of the Diaghilev Ballet.  The story is that of Flannelette, an arcadian shepherdess of the early eighteenth century, wooed by the shepherd Bergamot (Pas de Deux).  She's not very responsive. Six fairies then intrude - to Flannelette's amazement, whereupon a bugle sounds announcing the arrival of the evil Marquis de Poopinac, who is inflamed with love for Flannelette, and entices her towards a copse. Courtiers dance a Pavane, and prevent Bergamot from following. Flannelette rushes back on looking dishevelled, followed by the Marquis, who despatches Bergamot with his sword when attacked, and the story closes "to music of transcendental beauty".
Includes: 
Andantino
Bergamot
Pipe
Pas de Deux
Fairies
Marquise
Pavane
Finale     
There are also a lot of small musical links of never more than a few bars duration between e.g. Marquise and Pavane and Finale. 


BALLETS

ORIGIN: (1932)

USE: Words and Music, 1932

SOURCE: Vocal Score, Act II (Music No.15)

NOTES:
Contents: 
1: Announcement (vocal)
(The music for this is the same as for the vocal announcement for THE HALL OF FAME and JOURNEY'S END)
2: The Club (ballet) (vocal intro - Announcement - into):
3: The Boarding House (vocal intro - Announcement - into):
4: The Creche, and Waltz (Chopin)


BAR ON THE PICCOLA MARINA, A

ORIGIN: early September 1954

USE: 
Cabaret performance at Café de Paris, 18 October 1954
Beatrice Lillie in cabaret
NC in cabaret at Las Vegas

SOURCE: SA2 NCG2

NOTES: One of the most taut narrative comedy songs ever written.   If there was ever a case to be made that Coward abandoned controlled reserve in his writing it is to be made here.  The tale of Mrs. Wentworth-Brewster's - what?  Downfall?  Late flowering? - is the natural apogee to all those naughty winsome girlie NC songs of the early 20s.  It is funny, and stylish, and lewd all at once. 
The original opening words were "In a bijou abode in St Barnabas Road"... (see BD).  The word 'bijou' was part of a smart, high-camp language used by Tallulah Bankhead, Lord Lathom and Binkie Beaumont. 
The song was inspired by a 1954 visit to Capri, a vignette of which NC gives as his spoken introduction to the song on NCR 38.
The Peter Matz orchestration on NCR 38 is worth listening to closely - very subtle and deft use of accompanying instruments. 
NC later had to offer a very generous 25% of royalties on the song to Messrs. Ricordi for his (unauthorised!) use of a small extract from 'Funiculi Funicula'. 
This song is among the thirty most-performed NC numbers (see Appendix 3).  

DISCOGRAPHY:
NCR 38
: + Carlton Hays Orch./acc. Peter Matz (1955)
ONR 33: Beatrice Lillie acc. Eadie & Rack (1955)
ONR 26: Roderick Cook (Oh Coward!, 1972)
ONR 30: Peter Greenwell (1995)
ONR 09a: Michael Law (2002)


BASEBALL RAG See Appendix 1.a


BATHCHAIR, THE See ALLEGRO


BEATNIK LOVE AFFAIR

ORIGIN: See note on Appendix 1.b under GOLDENEYE CALYPSO regarding possible origin

USE: Sail Away 1961 (Grover Dale)

SOURCE: Vocal Score of Cowardy Custard (& Unpubl. MS)

NOTES: Calypso ballad.  The song is a “modern” pastiche, which is indicative of Coward’s whole approach to this early-60’s show composition.  This particular song is rather too obviously an attempt to be modern, and the colloquialisms and topical references in the lyrics (e.g. about the “Jack Parr Show” – meaningless to any non-American audience then, and even to most Americans today) have meant that the song has dated rather badly in spite of the fact that there was a little bit of lyric editing along the way which got rid of Jack Parr (see BD).  
The verse section of the song (“Why suffer from moral convictions…”) was originally written in a steady moderato syncopated rhythm in 4/4.  By the time of the production this had relaxed into a much more parlando 6/8, growing more naturally out of the dialogue which precedes it.  This is correctly printed in the Cowardy Custard Vocal Score.  At its third phrase it shows an abrupt Cowardesque keychange (from Eb into Gb).
The refrain section, all in steady-tempo syncopations, is intended to reflect a young, “hip” attitude in its music, with plenty of “beat”.  Again, all these rhythms were “tightened up” in performance and the Cowardy Custard Vocal Score reflects some of this. It enjoys a mature phrase-form with plenty of variety and growth, which could be simplified as musical ideas AA,BB,CD,AE.  The CD section does the same abrupt Cowardesque keychange (from Eb into a sort of Gb).  OCR 18 is orchestrated imaginatively, with little jazzy instumental and percussion breaks.  

DISCOGRAPHY:
NCR 43
:  acc. Werner? (Apr 1961)
OCR 18: Grover Dale (Oct 1961)
NCR 45: + orch./acc. Peter Matz (Dec 1961)
OCR 19: Grover Dale (1962)
ONR 07: Tudor Davies & Una Stubbs (C. Custard, 1972)


BERGAMOT See BALLET (THE LEGEND OF THE LILY)


BERTHA FROM BALHAM See Appendix 1.b


BERTIE See Appendix 1.b


BIRTHDAY TOAST

ORIGIN: (1946)

USE: Pacific 1860 (1946) (Tudor Evans)

SOURCE: Vocal Score (Act II, No.13) 

NOTES: A sort of recitative in which Mr Stirling thanks his guests for coming and proposes his daughter's health. NC later shamelessly re-used Mr Stirling's music for the introductory verse section of WHERE SHALL I FIND HIM (qv), which has two or three recordings.


BITTER SWEET VALSE (WALTZ AND TRIO)

ORIGIN: (1928/29)

USE: Bitter Sweet (1929) (end of Act II)

SOURCE: Vocal Score BS, music Nos. 13 & 20

NOTES: The vocal score gives this number simply as WALTZ (as have other sources) but it has also been known by this title, which we prefer on account of its clarity.
This music is first heard in the opening of Act II Scene 2, as we see for the first time the café populated at night time.  The music returns for the entire final scene of Act II, in which Sari is forced to dance with the abominable Captain August who then gropes her, and from which she is rescued by Carl who up until this point has been busy conducting the café orchestra, glancing furiously over his shoulder.  The music, obviously, stops at this point, and only the duel and Carl’s death remains to close the Act.  In itself, this is an unusual dramatic construct.
The music is a perfect Viennese waltz pastiche.  It is no less apt or pleasing a pastiche than any invented by Richard Strauss for similar sort of period atmosphere in Der Rosenkavalier.  The main theme comes complete with little decorative grace-notes, first falling by degrees and then balanced by rising degrees in its second half.  The whole is well-balanced by a contrasting middle phrase of much greater rhythmic and far less melodic interest. 

DISCOGRAPHY:
ONR 01:  New Sadler’s Wells Orch. cond. Reed (1988)


BONNE NUIT, MERCI

ORIGIN: (1928-29)

USE: Bitter Sweet 1929 (Ivy St. Helier)

SOURCE: Vocal Score 

NOTES: Pastiche naughty French nightclub song. Ashe on ONR 01 takes an unindulgent, vigorous, no nonsense approach to the piece and repeats the second verse - at a rush. 

DISCOGRAPHY:
ONR 02: Susan Hampshire + orch (1961)
ONR 01: Rosemary Ashe + New Sadler's Wells Orch. (1988)


BOTTLES AND BONES

ORIGIN: before May 1922

USE: Nelson Keys and George Grossmith at a Newspaper Press Fund matinee at Drury Lane in May 1922 

SOURCE: Music and lyrics lost

NOTES: All we know about this song is that it was "a brief duet" [SM1]


BREAKING IT GENTLY See DUKE OF YORK'S


BRIGHT WAS THE DAY

ORIGIN: 15 Jan 1946 [NCD]

USE: Pacific 1860, 1946 (Mary Martin & Graham Payn)

SOURCE: Sep.Publ.Vocal Score NCSB

NOTES: Waltz duet aria. The Diaries entry  shows clearly that the lyric came first with this song, and the music later and only after a struggle.  It was worth the struggle.  The refrain section is a classic example of NC's lyrical romanticism in full voice, with sweeping, lilting melodic phrases and shimmering sideways keychanges.  There is more than a touch here of the composer of Bitter Sweet, and with this in one's ears the production of the lush harmonies of the score of After The Ball only eight years later is not half so surprising. A slightly ungainly upwards  leap of a seventh towards the end of the second phrase of the refrain is the price paid for an otherwise satisfying structure of imitative phrases and phrase-lengths.   Bits of the music recur throughout the score of P1860.  It is a great shame that this song is not more recorded.  

DISCOGRAPHY:
OCR 13: Mary Martin & Graham Payn (1946) (also in 'FINALE')
NCR 29: Acc. Drury Lane Orch. cond. Mantonvani (Jan 1947)
ONR 25: Ann Ziegler + Harry Acres Orch. (Mar 1947)
ONR 14: Joan Sutherland + orch (1966)


BRIGHT YOUNG PEOPLE

ORIGIN: 1930 [NCSL]

USE: Cochran's 1931 Revue, (Queenie Leonard, Edward Cooper and Effie Atherton)

SOURCE: CPA2 (1939)

NOTES: Mixed trio or Quartet point-number.  A neglected, rather good comedy number in fast 3/4 tempo which is really an early Cowardesque  6/8.  The song has (justifiably) been included in the recent Sheridan Morley Noël and Gertie productions.  It's about young rich people doing peculiar things, somewhat in the style of 'Marvellous Party'.  One line foreshadows NC's later impatience with modern art: "Our critics are often excessively rude,/ To one of my portraits they always allude:/ It's me, worked in beads, upside down, in the nude./ What could be duller than that?” 

DISCOGRAPHY:
ONR 26
: Cook, Casson & Ross (Oh Coward!, 1972)


BRIGHTON PARADE

ORIGIN: (1933)

USE: Music No.1 of Conversation Piece, (1934) after 'Prologue'

SOURCE: Vocal Score

NOTES: Instrumental tableau. It starts with a 95-bar polka (BRIGHTON PARADE) ending with the direction "Exit Tart and Two Sailors". Then follows the entrance of Sophie Otford etc.(20 bars), the entrance of Regency Rakes to REGENCY RAKES Valse briefly,  then ENTRANCE OF CHILDREN (71 bars, all in valse tempo); all the foregoing apart from the first 10 bars is firmly in Eb. There's a bold keychange to Ab for a brief bit of traditional melody from a Lavender Woman before we return to the Brighton Parade theme again, which brings the scene to an end some 60 bars later when Paul knocks on the door of Melanie's house

DISCOGRAPHY:
ONR 06: Orch. Cond. Engel (1951)


BRITANNIA RULES THE WAVES (Also known as UP GIRLS AND AT 'EM)

ORIGIN: (1927)

USE: This Year of Grace, 1928 (Maisie Gay + chorus)

SOURCE: Vocal Score

NOTES: Revue Song.  A further part of the 'ENGLISH LIDO' sketch (q.v.) A rousing number celebrating the character and staunch Englishness of lady cross-channel swimmers, with a classic example of a 6/8 tempo refrain in music-hall style. 

DISCOGRAPHY:
ONR 34: Mantovani orchestra (1947)


BRONXVILLE DARBY AND JOAN

ORIGIN: (1961)

USE: intended for the US prod. of Sail Away, but not used; Reinserted into the score for the UK prod.

SOURCE: Vocal Score of Cowardy Custard

NOTES: Point number.  Lyrically this is strong, but musically the refrain suffers from a lack of melodic and phrasal development, seeming to come to a conclusion before one is quite ready for it. The deliciously "bitchy" words are set to a deceptively gentle melody in a sort of slow-shuffle dotted-rhythm 4/4 tempo.

DISCOGRAPHY:
NCR 43
 is the 'demo tape' made in advance of the show, and NCR 44 is an example of NC enjoying himself in his own work in a non-commercial recording.     
NCR 43: Pno. Acc. Werner? (Apr 1961)
NCR 44: NC and Joe Layton (Oct 1961)
OCR 19: Edith Day & Grover Dale (1962)
ONR 07: Patricia Routledge & John Moffat (1972)


BUBBLES See DUKE OF YORK'S


BUNCH, BUNCH See Appendix 1.b


BURCHELLS OF BATTERSEA RISE, THE

ORIGIN: (Possibly a while before 1945) 

USE: Sigh No More, 1945 (Cyril Ritchard, Madge Elliot, Joyce Grenfell and Graham Payn)

SOURCE: Unpubl.  The archive MS is in an unrecognised MS hand, which (as it is neither Robb Stewart's nor Norman Hackforth's, who did the MSS of all the other material for this show) may mean that it significantly pre-dates them. It is possible that the tune of this song could be the “waltz” NC refers to in an unpublished Diaries extract of October 12th 1944 as having been “completed” on that date, and started around the 4th.  Later Diaries entries definitely show work on the number concluding on April 25-26 1945. 

NOTES: Chorus song, all in brisk waltz-tempo, a celebration of the lower-middle-class attitudes and values.  In the existing MS, the harmonic underlay is not very well-structured; but the fault lies partly in the melody, which neither has a "strong" tune nor lends itself to straightforward harmonisation.
The archives preserve three extra unpublished refrains - quoted in full in BD (p.232)


BUSINESSMEN See MAZURKA


BYGONE DAYS See Appendix 1.c